Dominant-Minority Relations in America: Linking Personal History with the Convergence in the New World / Edition 1

Dominant-Minority Relations in America: Linking Personal History with the Convergence in the New World / Edition 1

by John P. Myers
ISBN-10:
0205297501
ISBN-13:
9780205297504
Pub. Date:
04/28/2002
Publisher:
Pearson

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Overview

Dominant-Minority Relations in America: Linking Personal History with the Convergence in the New World / Edition 1

This combination of book and website allows readers to study racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States using a combination of sociology, social history, and their own personal family histories. Grounded in sociology and the idea that we are all part of the process of dominant-minority interaction, this book helps the reader learn core sociological theory and concepts. Coverage includes the study of minority group experiences, and asks the reader to relate their extended family biographies to sociology and the larger minority group experience. Important questions such as: What is sociology and how can it help us understand inter-group relations? Are there oppressed groups that are racial and ethnic groups? Is the United States alone in its inter-groups norms and practices are covered. Readers also are provided with a comparison of the U.S. with dominant-minority relations in other countries, such as South Africa, Northern Ireland, Puerto Rico, and Vietnam. The unique companion website offers additional resources to research and discuss a wide variety of related topics. Anyone interested in gaining an understanding of the historical and current state of minority relations in the U.S.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780205297504
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 04/28/2002
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 576
Product dimensions: 7.25(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.25(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

PART I: Introduction to Sociology and the Sociology of Minority Groups.

1. What Is Sociology and How Can It Help Us Understand Intergroup Relations?

Intergroup Relations.

Basic Definitions.

Methods.

Theoretical Perspectives.

2. What Are the Key Definitions and Concepts in Sociology of Minority Groups?

Migrant, Immigrant, and Emigrant.

Ethnic Group.

Race.

Racism and Ethnocentrism.

Minority Group.

Dominant Group.

Prejudice and Discrimination.

Causes of Discrimination.

3. Are Race and Ethnicity the Only Sources of Oppression in Our Society?

What Are Some Oppressed Groups?

How (In)Tolerant Are We?

What Should We Call These Groups?

Definition of Minority Groups Based on Race and Ethnicity.

Logistical Reasons for Focusing on Minority Groups Based on Race.

Why Study Oppressed Groups Based on Characteristics Other Than Race and Ethnicity?

Minority Groups Based on Gender.

Minority Group Based on Sexual Orientation.

Minority Groups Based on Other Statuses.

Minority Groups That Discriminate Against Other Racial and Ethnic Groups.

4. Are We Alone in Our Intergroup Values and Norms?

Apartheid in South Africa.

Present-Day Northern Ireland.

1930s and 1940s Germany.

Present-Day Puerto Rico.

Present-Day Vietnam.

Other Examples.

5. What Do the Numbers in the United States Look Like? Brown Edges with a White Middle?

Where Do the Numbers Come From?

What Should We Know About the U.S. Census?

What Do the Numbers Look Like?

6. Can We Construct a Model to Explain and Predict Intergroup Relations?

Intergroup Relations?

What Is the Question?

An Overview of the Approach.

Assimilation, Pluralism, Functionalism, and Conflict.

Functionalism and Assimilation.

Functionalism and Ideology.

The Conflict Perspective and Minority Group Theory.

Conflict and Assimilation: A Single Model.

What Are the Questions to Ask Based on the Model?

Family Background Project.

PART II: How Can We Apply Sociological Theory to Explain Group Experience?

7. Native Americans.

Overview.

What Was the Nature of the Dominant Group's Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

Conclusion.

8. African Americans.

Overview and Comparison to Native Americans.

What Was the Nature of the Dominant Groups Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing.

9. Irish Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and German Americans.

What Was the Nature of the Dominant Group's Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

Family Background and Irish Americans.

10. German Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African and Native Americans.

What Was the Nature of the Dominant Group's Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation of Power Sharing?

Family Background and German Americans.

11. Italian Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and German Americans.

What Was the Nature of the Dominant Group's Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

Family Background and Italian Americans.

12. Second-Stream Jewish Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and First-Stream and Other Second-Stream Immigrants.

What Was the Nature of the Initial Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and of Minority Groups?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Gentile Groups Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

13. Japanese Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and First-Stream and Other Second-Stream Immigrants.

What Was the Nature of the Initial Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and of Other Minority Groups?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

14. Mexican Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and First-Stream Immigrants.

What Was the Nature of the Anglo Group's Initial Conflict Position?

What Were the Responses of the Minority Group?

What Tactics Did the Dominant Group Use to Maintain Dominance?

To What Extent Was the Minority Group Community Separate and Established, and How Much Power Did That Community Generate?

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

15. Vietnamese Americans.

Overview and Comparison to African, Native, and First-Stream and Second-Stream Immigrants.

What Was the Conflict Position of the Dominant Group and of Other Groups?

Responses of the Vietnamese and Community Building.

What Are the Types and Extent of Assimilation or Power Sharing?

16. Final Thoughts: Theory, Intergroup History, and Family Background.

The Theory and Questions We Used to Structure the Study of Minority Groups.

Generalizations About Intergroup Relations in U.S. Society.

Applications to the Family Background Project.

References.

Index.

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