Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union

Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union

by Paul Kendrick, Stephen Kendrick
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Hardcover(First Edition)

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Overview

Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union by Paul Kendrick, Stephen Kendrick

Although Abraham Lincoln deeply opposed the existence of slavery, he saw his mission throughout much of the Civil War as preserving the Union, with or without slavery. Frederick Douglass, a former slave, passionately believed the war's central mission to be the total abolition of slavery. During their meetings between 1863 and 1865, and through reading each other's speeches and letters, they managed to forge a strong, mutual understanding and respect that helped convince Lincoln the war could not be truly won without black soldiers and permanent emancipation.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780802715234
Publisher: Walker & Company
Publication date: 12/26/2007
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 6.75(w) x 9.08(h) x 1.12(d)

About the Author

Paul Kendrick, an assistant director of the Harlem Children's Zone in New Y ork City, and Stephen Kendrick, the senior minister of First Church in Boston, are coauthors of Sarah's Long Walk, named one of the five best history books of 2005 by the Christian Science Monitor.

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Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As the Kendrick's stated at a recent book talk on their new work: 'we often approach this war [Civil War] through the lens of its ending...but it wasn't like this at all at the time.' This book chronicles, in a very enjoyable novel-like way, the constantly shifting dynamics of the War as reflected in the personal relationship of two great men. Not afraid to tackle the folklore that surrounds each man, Paul and Stephen Kendrick provide helpful insight into a profound relationship.