Dr. Neruda's Cure for Evil

Dr. Neruda's Cure for Evil

by Rafael Yglesias

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781453206607
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 11/16/2010
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 700
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Rafael Yglesias (b. 1954) is a master American storyteller whose career began with the publication of his first novel, Hide Fox, and All After, at seventeen. Through four decades Yglesias has produced numerous highly acclaimed novels, including Fearless, which was adapted into the film starring Jeff Bridges and Rosie Perez. He lives on New York City’s Upper East Side.


 

Rafael Yglesias (b. 1954) is a master American storyteller whose career began with the publication of his first novel, Hide Fox, and All After, at seventeen. Through four decades Yglesias has produced numerous highly acclaimed novels, including Fearless, which was adapted into the film starring Jeff Bridges and Rosie Perez. He lives on New York City’s Upper East Side.

 

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Dr. Neruda's Cure For Evil 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
CBJames on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have been fascinated with the work of psychologists and psychiatrists since the time in high school when I saw Robert Redford's film Ordinary People, which centers on a young man's visits to his psychiatrist, to my current fascination with HBO's In Treatment starring Gabriel Byrne as a troubled psychiatrist dealing with his patients, his failing marriage and his own crisis of faith in psychotherapy. I suppose I should include the time I spent watchingg The Bob Newhart Show, too. Sigmund Freud's talking cure makes for fascinating theatre, whether it works or not.A psychiatrist who attempts to cure evil has lots to offer someone with an interest in the field, even a skeptical interest. Make him the novel's narrator and you have Rafael Yglesias's, Dr. Neruda's Cure for Evil. As the narrator and title character explains, in order to understand and evaluate what happens to patients in therapy we must understand the doctor treating them. The first part of the novel looks at the significant events in Dr. Neruda's childhood. The second looks at one of Dr. Neruda's patients who succeed in coming to grips with the world only to find his own so full of evil that he could not face living in it. The final section describes Dr. Neruda's attempt to cure the evil mentioned in part two. I enjoyed part one, thought part two fascinating, but found part three unconvincing. Mr. Iglesias's novel is at its best when the focus is on the work of psychotherapy. A novel about work is a rare thing these days, unless the work is somehow related to criminology. That all three parts of Dr. Neruda's Cure for Evil feature the work of psychotherapy make for a refreshing change. In the first, young Rafael Neruda undergoes psychotherapy after a failed suicide attempt. His doctor becomes his professional mentor after he enters a career as a psychotherapist in part two. In the final part, Dr. Neruda puts his professional reputation on the line in an attempt to cure two people whom he classifies as evil. Dr. Neruda treats patients with extreme problems, abused and severely traumatized children much like he was himself. Their cases and their treatment are fascinating reading. In part two Dr. Neruda treats a more average patient, with what appear to be a run-of-the-mill set of neurosis as a favor to a friend and for the chance it offers him to take a break from his more serious work. These two sections of the novel worked for me, but the third section went astray as it went into uncharted territory. When Dr. Neruda encounters two people who are comfortable in their success in spite of their clear sadistic characters, he concludes that they are evil and that he must cure them. While Mr. Yglesias portrays even this fantastic section of his novel with a convincing realism, I found it a hard pill to swallow. But, two out of three ain't bad, as they say.