Dreaming in Hindi: Coming Awake in Another Language

Dreaming in Hindi: Coming Awake in Another Language

by Katherine Russell Rich

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780547336930
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 06/10/2010
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 697,634
Product dimensions: 5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.87(d)

About the Author

KATHERINE RUSSELL RICH was the award-winning author of The Red Devil: To Hell with Cancer—and Back. She wrote for the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, Slate, and Vogue, and taught writing at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, until her death in 2012 after a nearly quarter-century battle with breast cancer.

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Dreaming in Hindi: Coming Awake in Another Language 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
karenlisa on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Dreaming in Hindi By Katherine Russell Rich Memoir of a year journey to study Hindi in Udaipur, India. Katherine is a writer/editor in New York City. She is divorced, 45 years old and has battled cancer for the last 10 years. Something is missing. Her life feels narrow. She needs "something" and has an indescribable passion for wanting to learn Hindi. Katherine loses her job at a magazine and even though most people around her criticize, she welcomes an opportunity to live in India and study Hindi for a year. People are perplexed by her decision or as she truthfully admits "just jealous!"This experience has extreme highs and depressing lows. It is a journey to acquire a new language and a new perspective on life, on people. Katherine's journey is detailed in an honest open manner, she is direct and witty. Interspersed is an enormous amount of scientific study she has acquired through research and interviews and attached to her own experience. The actual neuroscience of second language versus native tongue, along with how our brains learn, store and use this information.Certainly worth the read, simultaneously informative and heartfelt. If you are multilingual or wish to be, whatever language your dreams are in, open your eyes and ears, its a big world out there.
dddd89 on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I am proud of myself for getting through this book. I wish she would just recount her experiences in India and leave out tidbits about how learning a language effects the brain. I did enjoy learning things about Indian culture that only a person who spoke Hindi could know.
Basil More than 1 year ago
"Dreaming in Hindi" offers the perils of learning a second language, as told by the intrepid student linguist Katherine Russell Rich. "This book, the way I'd conceived it before I left [for India], was going to be solely about the near mystical and transformative powers of language: the way that words, with only the tensile strength of breath, can tug you out of one world and land you in the center of another." Then, with this ambitious manifesto nailed down, Rich casually admits that she basically lacks foreign language skills. "I simply love the process...Me, when I travel, I just want to speak. I've always been fascinated by language in any form, the more unintelligible, the better." Well, she couldn't have picked a better subject than Hindi, the great--formidably great--language of India. Is it hard? Betcha. In New York, Rich took preparatory lessons from a "moonlighting" Columbia professor, Ms. Susham Bedi, "and the language was making my head smolder. One misplaced m, and you were no longer saying "weather" but "husband of maternal aunt." You had to learn to think in sentences whose verbs went at the end, which had the effect of producing vertigo: "to the house the mother the child is taking." Pronunciation was another horror. And writing the sentence was, well: "I couldn't write it. The beautiful letters, like stick trees that had bumped into a ceiling or a revue of performing snakes, came out like cows' heads in my hands. I was frustrated and fascinated." The learning process created psychological effects. "At night I dream in Hindi I can't understand. The language has to stay fixed, or I'll lose the nuance: Aap, not ap...I know it when they say it, then two days later, it's gone. My English sometimes now feels spotty, as if, in preserving the new words as long as possible, my brain keeps the old ones tamped down." This is a colorful, witty, eloquent, moving read by a persevering author who has a remarkable story to tell--about the words we speak.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was excited to read this book but it was so slow moving I did not even finish it.
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