Dreamquake: Book Two of the Dreamhunter Duet

Dreamquake: Book Two of the Dreamhunter Duet

by Elizabeth Knox

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Overview

The dreamhunting began as a beautiful thing, when Tziga Hame discovered that he could enter the Place and share the dreams he found there with other people. But Tziga Hame has disappeared and Laura, his daughter, knows that the art of projecting dreams has turned sour.

On St. Lazarus's Eve, when elite citizens gather at the Rainbow Opera to experience the sweet dream of Homecoming, Laura, determined to show them the truth, plunges them into the nightmare used to control the convict workers. The event marks the first blow in the battle for control of the Place, the source of dreams. Then, when Laura's cousin, Rose, uncovers evidence that the government has been building a secret rail line deep into the Place, Laura follows it to find out what lies at its end. As she struggles to counter the government's sinister plans, a deeper mystery surfaces, a puzzle only Laura can unravel, a puzzle having to do with the very nature of the Place. What is the Place, after all? And what does it want from her?

Inventive and richly imagined, Elizabeth Knox's Dreamquake, dramatic conclusion to the Dreamhunter Duet, will satisfy readers – whether or not they've read Book One.

"It is like nothing else I've ever read." — Stephenie Meyer, The Twilight Saga

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312581473
Publisher: Square Fish
Publication date: 09/29/2009
Series: Dreamhunter Duet Series , #2
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 896,801
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile: 850L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Elizabeth Knox is the author of several books for adults, including The Vintner's Luck. Dreamhunter was her first novel for younger readers. She lives in Wellington, New Zealand.

Read an Excerpt

Dreamquake

Book Two of the Dreamhunter Duet
By Knox, Elizabeth

Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)

Copyright © 2007 Knox, Elizabeth
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0374318549


From Dreamquake
The stand of trees Laura had picked as a landmark was getting closer, but only very slowly. She sighed and picked up her pace. She was hungry, but that was no excuse for dragging her feet and daydreaming.
 
A while later, when she'd raised a sweat and her mind was just idling, the thought that had been trailing her for days – possibly since Rose first told her about the "surplus rails" – finally caught up with her. She remembered that the Grand Patriarch had asked her about the "Depot."
 
Laura raised her head and squinted up the line. The "Depot" wasn't the name of a dream – it was a destination, where something was stored.
 
What else had the Grand Patriarch said? There was something else, a name from a rumor, because hadn't the Grand Patriarch said that most of his intelligence came from rumors?
 
Contentment.
 
Laura stopped walking when the word came into her head. She stood still, shivering and short of breath. The world darkened around her as her pupils contracted. Dread had crept up and pounced on her. And, now that she was still, she understood that her footsteps had masked a vibration.
 
A steely rolling was coming from the line behind her.
 
Laura spun to face back along the line. She saw the handcar bearing down upon her, fast. Riding on it were six rangers.

Continues...

Excerpted from Dreamquake by Knox, Elizabeth Copyright © 2007 by Knox, Elizabeth. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Part I The Isle of the Temple,
Part II Foreigner's North,
Part III Summer and Christmas,
Part IV The Depot,
Part V The Gate,
Part VI Epidemic Contentment,
Part VII Lazarus Hame,
Epilogue,
Glossary,

Reading Group Guide

Laura comes from a world similar to our own except for one difference: it is next to the Place, an unfathomable land that fosters dreams of every kind and is inaccessible to all but a select few, the dreamhunters. These are individuals with special gifts: the ability to catch larger than-life dreams and relay them to audiences in the magnificent dream palace, the Rainbow Opera. People travel from all around to experience the benefits of the hunters' unique visions.

In Dreamhunter, Book One, fifteen-year-old Laura and her cousin Rose, daughters of dreamhunters, are eligible to test themselves at the Place and find out whether they qualify for the passage. But nothing can prepare them for what they are about to discover. For within the Place lies a horrific secret kept hidden by corrupt members of the government. And when Laura's father disappears, she realizes that this secret has the power to destroy everyone she loves. In Dreamquake, Book Two, Laura and Rose discover that the government has built a railroad leading deep into the Place, and Laura decides to follow the line to its end. As she attempts to discern the government's sinister plans, a deeper mystery unfolds, one that only Laura can solve, and it involves the very origin of the Place. What is the Place exactly? And what does it want from Laura?

In the midst of a fascinating landscape, Laura's dreamy childhood is ending and a nightmare beginning. These rich novels, filled with beauty, danger, politics, and intrigue, lead to a powerful crescendo and finally to a dramatic and satisfying conclusion.

1. In the Dreamhunter Duet, dreams are bought and sold as commodities. How are these dreams similar to television programs or movies in our modern society?

2. The Dreamhunter Duet is set in the early twentieth century. How does the historical setting affect the story? How would it be different if it were during the present time?

3. How do different groups of people—the Church, the Regulatory Body, dreamhunters themselves, and the general public—react differently to the industry of dreamhunting? What are the motives behind their reactions?

4. Both books in the Dreamhunter Duet are complex, with several storylines that come together seamlessly. How do these simultaneous storylines affect the books' progression

5. Laura is a teenager, yet she works in an adult field as a dreamhunter. How does she change and develop through her experiences? Would her choices have been different if she'd been ten years older?

6. Though Rose and Laura are first cousins and good friends, they are very different people. How are their differences and similarities apparent on their separate paths—dreamhunter versus debutante? How would the story change if Rose were the dreamhunter and Laura the debutante?

7. When Laura realizes that the Regulatory Body is using nightmares as a form of punishment for prisoners, she decides to let people know about it by overdreaming her aunt at the Rainbow Opera and sharing the nightmare with the well-to-do audience. What result does this have? What other courses of action could Laura have taken?

8. The public officials and the Regulatory Body that oversee dreamhunters use dreams to punish people and to control popular thought. Debate whether or not the government should use dreams for these purposes.

9. What role does the Sandman play? How is he symbolic?

10. If dreams were available today as a form of entertainment, how would the public react to them? How would the government? Would you attend a performance at a dream theater?

Customer Reviews

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Dreamquake: Book Two of the Dreamhunter Duet 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
There is a lot I want to say about this book, but first I have to say a bit about how the duet actually works. Some readers feel strongly, and fairly, that the Duet cannot be read in isolation (that is the two books cannot stand alone). Other readers, also fairly, feel that the books can and do work well as individual pieces of prose. I actually agree with both viewpoints. Just a bit about the basic plot of Dreamhunter: I'm not all that familiar with New Zealand but a review from the New Zealand Listener tells me that Knox's novels are set in "something like the New Zealand of a century ago, but with a twist, in that social life revolves around a traffic in dreams." The rare people who can catch dreams (dreamhunters) perform them for the social elite at dream palaces like the Rainbow Opera. Dreams are also often used for the public good in hospitals around Southland. Some dreamhunters also capture nightmares which readers learn in Dreamhunter are used for the public good, but in a much more sinister way. Laura, our protagonist, discovers this fact when she begins investigating the disappearance of her father, one of the greatest dreamhunters Southland has ever seen. Outraged by what she has seen, Laura sets out to inform the public of the governments use of nightmares. Dreamhunter ends with the disastrous results of this attempt. It is therefore no surprise that Dreamquake opens with the chaos following the execution of Laura's plan as Southland and Laura's family are thrown into a state of disarray. Adrift with only her creation Nown and a nightmare, Laura has to find a way to earn back her family's trust while negotiating an entanglement with a fellow young dreamhunter. All this while continuing to investigate the corruption of the sinister Dream Regulatory Body created to control the Place and its invaluable resources. Dreamquake is every bit as good as Dreamhunter while also being even better because it expands on characters who don't get as much time to shine in the first novel. Sandy and Rose (and to some extent Nown) are back and much more engaged in the central plot than they were in Dreamhunter to great effect. Knox's prose is unique in that it is well-paced while also being high action. Knox takes her time to explain terms like "Soporif" and "Novelists" but never to the detriment of the story. The action here is so intense and gripping that, at several points in the novel, I found myself skimming ahead just to make sure that everything would turn out all right in the end. The Dreamhunter Duet is a rare thing in contemporary literature. Both books are rich enough that, were the main characters not teenagers, no one would question its place as an adult book-but I've made that argument about other books on this site. More to the point, Knox is an amazing writer. Dreamhunter and Dreamquake are populated by a wide variety of characters, each unique and fully realized on the page. Instead of creating a world and characters and even this story, it feels instead like Knox is introducing readers to old friends, reciting a familiar tale-everything within these novels seems so real, the details are so concrete, that it feels like folly to consider it fantastic or even fiction. And that is why Dreamquake (and Dreamhunter) will surely take their rightful places among the canon of great fantasy novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book, and its companion, DreamHunter, impressesd me so thoroughly that, after reading them at the library 3 times, I went and bought them. Fantasy books are some times too far fetched to be taken litererally, but not this book! It had just enpugh a dose of reality in it to keep me interested and was still sonout of the norm that I found mysrlf entranced by this new forgin world. Amazing writing in both books. Well done! I must say it was a bit slow to start, but if you keep with it you won't be dissapointed. :) sory for the spelling errors, the screen is messd up.
jasmyn9 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read the first book in the Dreamhunter duet as part of the Most Underappreciated Book Contest earlier this year. It intrigued me enough that I went out and got the second. However, about half way through I almost put the book down. The characters seemed to be stuck in a loop trying to figure the same things out over and over again.Things were just taking too long for me, but I stuck through it and the second half of the book made up it. The characters started to develop again and the plot become involved and was progressing once again.Laura Hame is once again center stage of the story, and she has finally started to put things together about the mysterious Place. The pieces eventually fell together quite nicely and the story ended well.3/5
Cecily_Templeton More than 1 year ago
It all comes together in this beautifully-created fantasy world. I was captivated to the last page!
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Jasmyn9 More than 1 year ago
I read the first book in the Dreamhunter duet as part of the Most Underappreciated Book Contest earlier this year. It intrigued me enough that I went out and got the second. However, about half way through I almost put the book down. The characters seemed to be stuck in a loop trying to figure the same things out over and over again. Things were just taking too long for me, but I stuck through it and the second half of the book made up it. The characters started to develop again and the plot become involved and was progressing once again. Laura Hame is once again center stage of the story, and she has finally started to put things together about the mysterious Place. The pieces eventually fell together quite nicely and the story ended well. 3/5
cdotson More than 1 year ago
I was really disappointed with Dreamhunter...but I kept reading it and decided to buy Dreamquake thinking it would be better...I got halfway through and couldn't finish. I thought they were going to be good reads! I was wrong...