Duty: A Father, His Son, and the Man Who Won the War

Duty: A Father, His Son, and the Man Who Won the War

by Bob Greene
5.0 20

Hardcover(1 ED)

$17.27 $25.00 Save 31% Current price is $17.27, Original price is $25. You Save 31%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Duty: A Father, His Son, and the Man Who Won the War 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A terrific book.  It goes a long way to enlighten those of us who grew up in the years since WWII to understand what shaped that generation. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent read!!
2silverspurs More than 1 year ago
Coud not put it down. I did not want this book to end. My dad worked on the Manhattan Project. My uncles: USS St. Louis, in the jungles, on Iwo Jima, guarded German POW's in Wisconsin, guarded Goering at the war trials. One fellow I knew carried the packs of the older soldiers, another was on the ship going to invade Japan. I knew a SeaBee who was on the Mariana Islands and knew the fellow who invented the SeaBee insigna. My dad was in his 30's with 3 kids and terrible eyesight, and he got his draft papers! Thank you, Paul Tibbets for ending the war. You are (were) a great man. I had a chance to meet you but did not. You are my hero.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reading Bob Greene's account of his quest to get to know his father, and the role Paul Tibbets played in drawing that out, was truly breath-taking. He (Greene) would at times touch a nerve in his narrative, and I would reflect on how I wish I had gotten to know my Dad better, and all the unanswered questions I would ask him, if I could. Thanks, Bob. Your book is one of the finer reads I have had in many a year. I would rate this book a 5, without hesitation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is well written, an outstanding piece of literature. Truley shows the hearts of the American military men and women, and its supporters. I'm proud to read such a work of art, and plan to read it many times over.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a WONDERFUL book that I have read many times. It really makes evident why people in the military do what they do. It's beautifully written.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a wonderful book. If there is a book that can highlight the differences between today's older and younger generations, this would be it. It doesn't do it in any sort of controversial way. At times, it's done with humor. Sometimes a bit of sadness. Always with respect. Some of the comments by General Tibbets caused me to look at myself and ask myself some rather unpleasant questions. (I'm 41) At the same time the above descriptions bring the book home to the heart, it also allows us to see ourselves, at whatever age one might be, in the light of our now passing heritage. There are some surprising insights in it. Spend some time with it, this Memorial Day weekend. It's worth it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book clearly deserves more than five stars! 'Doolittle's Raiders -- Those Were Real Heroes' This quote came from Paul Tibbets, the man who piloted the Enola Gay (named after his mother) to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in August 1945. He was referring to the crews that bombed Japan shortly after the start of the U.S. engagement in World War II, in a stirring symbolic strike at our Pacific enemy of those years. They had no way to come back to American bases with their planes, and had to fly onto the Asian mainland and hope to find their way back to the U.S. on their own. Many did not survive the mission. What many do not know is that Tibbets also headed the unit that prepared to drop the atomic bombs. He ordered himself to pilot the first flight, out of his sense of responsibility for getting the job done right. Many who have not read the book will think this book is a biography of Tibbets, who has remained out of the limelight since World War II. That thought is partially correct. But the book is much more than that, even though that would have been a lot. The author became interested in Tibbets because the author's father was so obviously in awe of Tibbets. The father would mention seeing Tibbets in their common hometown of Columbus, Ohio, but never approached him. Inspired by his father's interest, the author finally meets Tibbets shortly before the author's father dies. Then begins one of those wonderful human experiences that we each should have, and books like this allow us to experience vicariously. Although Tibbets never met the father, he instantly understood him. In many informal talks and visits, the author came to understand for the first time both Tibbets and his own father who had left a tape recorded oral history. There is a wonderful epiphany near the end of the book when the author finally understands why Tibbets meant so much to his father. I won't spoil it for you, but it's worth reading the whole book to get to this one story. This book will be very appealing to anyone who read and liked The Greatest Generation. By focusing on the lives of just a few men (Tibbets, two of Tibbets' crew mates, and Greene's father) you get a richness and wholeness to the lives that makes it all come together much better than can happen with briefer stories. In a sense, the two books are companion pieces. In fact, I recommend that most people read Duty first, and then read The Greatest Generation. If you have already read The Greatest Generation, you should reread it after you have read Duty. You'll have many new insights as a result. My next suggestion is that you then seek out someone who fought in World War II (a relative would be great if you have one) and talk to them about their experiences and what you thought you learned from these two books. You should be able to lift a generational curtain in the process, and make some wonderful human contact that would not have otherwise have been possible. In this way, you can pay real tribute to all those who made our modern world possible. To me, I beg to differ with Paul Tibbets' quote. I think
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bob Greene does a wonderful job of weaving his fathers recorded messages in with the man who flew the Enola Gay. Greene is able to paint a picture of a generation of men who did what they were asked to do without question or fear a failure. In a 'Field of Dreams' like way Greene gives the reader an opportunity to be apart of a father/son relationship that I am sure male readers could identify with.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am one of those saved from a beach invasion of Japan by the Enola Gay Crew. My orders bore the code designation LION 9 (Landing invasion and occupation Navy) We were equipped with Army uniforms, helmets etc with no real training for that activity. My two sons, my wife and I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to know Paul Tibbets and to read what to us is the very best commentary on my generation. Thank you for a most entertaining and inspiring book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My father served as a medic in the United States Army's 199th Infantry Regiment of the 30th Infantry Division -- the famed Old Hickory division -- from D-Day plus four until VE Day. He participated in five major battles: in Normandy, Northern France, the Rhineland, Central Europe, and the German Ardennes Offensive -- which is better known as the Battle of the Bulge. He died this past February and I only know this much about his service from the research my brother did in order to give a proper eulogy. Apart from telling us years ago that he would like for his casket to be draped with an American flag, he never really discussed his experiences in the war or his pride at having served. Bob Greene's touching exploration of his dying father's wartime service and the effect it had on him and his family through the rest of his life, discovered through Greene's exploration of the life and legacy of Paul Tibbets -- the Man Who Won the War -- fills an emotional and historical vacuum in my own life and education. I was touched by the simple observations and enlightened by what I learned from the author's conversations and experiences with Mr. Tibbets, Mr. Van Kirk and Mr. Ferebee. If you are the child of a World War II veteran, treat yourself to this book. You won't regret it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent novel written about the flight to Hiroshima. I would like to thank Paul Tibbets for doing his duty and I think that he did help win the war. You saved American and Japanese lives and I thank you. I really liked the part in the book that discusses the tapes that were left to Bob Greene.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This quote came from Paul Tibbets, the man who piloted the Enola Gay (named after his mother) to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in August 1945. He was referring to the crews that bombed Japan shortly after the start of the U.S. engagement in World War II, in a stirring symbolic strike at our Pacific enemy of those years. They had no way to come back with their planes, and had to fly onto the Asian mainland and hope to find their way back to the U.S. Many did not survive the mission. What many do not know is that Tibbets also headed the unit that prepared to drop the atomic bombs. He ordered himself to pilot the first flight, out of his sense of responsibility for getting the job done right. Many will think this book is a biography of Tibbets, who has remained out of the limelight since World War II. That thought is partially correct. But the book is much more than that, even though that would have been a lot. The author became interested in Tibbets because the author's father was so obviously in awe of Tibbets. He would mention seeing Tibbets in their common hometown of Columbus, Ohio, but never approached him. Inspired by his father's interest, the author finally meets Tibbets shortly before his father dies. Then begins one of those wonderful human experiences that we each should have, and books like this allow us to experience vicariously. Although Tibbets never met the father, he instantly understood him. In many informal talks and visits, the author came to understand both Tibbets and his own father who had left a tape recorded oral history. There is a wonderful epiphany near the end of the book when the author finally understands why Tibbets meant so much to his father. I won't spoil it for you, but it's worth reading the whole book to get to this one story. This book will be very appealing to any
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found the book to be most informative and emotional, it brought tears to my eyes many times. I found it very hard to put it down. Well done Mr. Green.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I learned a lot about Hiroshima and a lot more about the men who fought in WW II. It's a great read. Greene did a terrific job.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading this book. It is a book to be read by everyone whose Parents or Grandparents were of the World War II Generation. This is an honest, insightful, and honorable tribute to the hero Paul Tibbets of the Enola Gay, and to Major Time Greene of the 91st Infantry Division, one of the many unsung heroes that put it all on the line to save the free world. One comes away with a knowledge of how our greatest generation viewed the world and their moral character. One also gets a wake up call as to their opinion of the current generation. If you have recently laid to rest a Parent of Grandparent from the WWII era, as I have, this book will help you cherish their memory even more.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr Greene has written about two men that are very dear to him, his father and General Paul Tibbets, pilot of the Enola Gay. Both men are true heroes and served this country well. Mr. Greene deftly mixes information gathered in numerous interviews with General Tibbets, with information about Bob's own father who served in WWII. The book brings to light fasinating facts about the pilot and crew that came together in the famed B-29, The Enola Gay, and dropped the first atomic bomb. In an era when many people try to ignore the past or rewrite history, this look at one of the most significant events of this past century should be required reading.