42nd Street

42nd Street

Director: Lloyd Bacon Cast: Warner Baxter, Bebe Daniels, George Brent

DVD (Full Frame)

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Product Details

Release Date: 03/21/2006
UPC: 0012569678521
Original Release: 1933
Rating: NR
Source: Warner Home Video
Region Code: 1
Time: 1:29:00
Sales rank: 12,568

Special Features

Closed Caption; 3 vntage featurettes: Harry Warren: America's foremost composer, Hollywood newsreel, a trip through a Hollywood studio; Notes on Busby Berkeley

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Warner Baxter Julian Marsh
Bebe Daniels Dorothy Brock
George Brent Pat Denning
Ruby Keeler Peggy Sawyer
Una Merkel Lorraine Fleming
Guy Kibbee Abner Dillon
Ginger Rogers Ann Lowell/Anytime Annie
Dick Powell Billy Lawler
Ned Sparks Thomas Barry
Allen Jenkins MacElroy
Henry B. Walthall The Actor
Eddie Nugent Terry Neil
Clarence Nordstrom Leading Man
Robert McWade Al Jones
George E. Stone Andy Lee
Harry Warren Songwriter
Albert Akst Jerry
Joan Barclay Actor
Busby Berkeley Actor
Adele Lacey Actor
Lyle Talbot Geoffrey Waring
Alexis Dubin Songwriter
Gertrude Keeler Actor
Jayne Shadduck Actor
Margaret La Marr Actor
Ruth Eddings Actor
Maxine Cantway Actor
Lynn Browning Actor
Toby Wing "Young and Healthy" Girl
Pat Wing Chorus Girl
Wallis Clark Dr. Chadwick
Jack LaRue A Mug
Louise Beavers Pansy
Dave "Tex" O'Brien Chorus Boy
Patricia Ellis Secretary
George S. Irving House Doctor
Charles Lane An Author
Milt Kibbee News Spreader
Rolfe Sedan Stage Aide
Harry Seymour Aide
Anne Hovey Chorus Girl
Renee Whitney Chorus Girl
Dorothy Coonan Chorus Girl
Barbara Rogers Chorus Girl
June Glory Chorus Girl
Loretta Andrews Chorus Girl
Donna Mae Roberts Chorus Girl
Lorena Layson Chorus Girl
Alice Jans Chorus Girl
Kermit Maynard Dancer Who Catches Girl
Tom Kennedy Slim Murphy
Dorothy White Dancer

Technical Credits
Lloyd Bacon Director
Busby Berkeley Choreography
Whitney Bolton Screenwriter
Alexis Dubin Songwriter
Leo F. Forbstein Musical Direction/Supervision
Gordon Hollingshead Asst. Director
Rian James Screenwriter
Nathan Levinson Sound/Sound Designer
Jack Okey Art Director
Orry-Kelly Costumes/Costume Designer
Sol Polito Cinematographer
Thomas Pratt Editor
James Seymour Screenwriter
Hal B. Wallis Producer
Frank Ware Editor
Harry Warren Songwriter
Perc Westmore Makeup
Darryl F. Zanuck Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- 42nd Street
1. Chapter 1 [1:21]
2. Chapter 2 [1:52]
3. Chapter 3 [2:57]
4. Chapter 4 [2:17]
5. Chapter 5 [4:06]
6. Chapter 6 [2:24]
7. Chapter 7 [4:31]
8. Chapter 8 [5:19]
9. Chapter 9 [2:29]
10. Chapter 10 [4:04]
11. Chapter 11 [4:38]
12. Chapter 12 [1:02]
13. Chapter 13 [2:37]
14. Chapter 14 [2:45]
15. Chapter 15 [2:46]
16. Chapter 16 [5:09]
17. Chapter 17 [2:37]
18. Chapter 18 [2:41]
19. Chapter 19 [4:45]
20. Chapter 20 [2:40]
21. Chapter 21 [3:18]
22. Chapter 22 [1:30]
23. Chapter 23 [2:15]
24. Chapter 24 [2:14]
25. Chapter 25 [5:26]
26. Chapter 26 [4:23]
27. Chapter 27 [5:48]
28. Chapter 28 [1:04]

Customer Reviews

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42nd Street 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BNMerch_Man More than 1 year ago
I suppose Lloyd Bacon directed 42nd Street, if that's what it says in the credits. But I suspect Busby Berkeley's fingerprints are all over this movie -- from the dance numbers he choreographed to the sophisticated camera direction to the brisk pacing. I worry sometimes about Hollywood's oldest classics becoming unwatchable to a generation that expects widescreen technicolor CGI with Dolby sound, a pounding, music video-inspired soundtrack, and absurdly photogenic stars. And it's more than possible that the under-30 crowd will never sit through 89 minutes of Ruby Keeler's gee-whiz acting and equestrian hoofing -- not to mention (ugh) that it's all in bo-ring black and white. But for all of its hokum (and I suspect the star-breaks-leg-and-novice-gets-chance plot was creaky even in 1933) 42nd Street is a witty, vibrant, wiseacre, superbly constructed musical that only those deeply incurious about America's past would refuse to enjoy. Better still, the DVD print is sharp, clean, and clear ... and in black and white it conveys the grit of Depression-era chroristers trying their damnedest to make it on Broadway -- and stay off the unemployment line.