A Few Days in September

A Few Days in September

Director: Santiago Amigorena Cast: Juliette Binoche, John Turturro, Sara Forestier
4.0 1

DVD (Wide Screen)

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Overview

A Few Days in September

A spy discovers doing a favor for a friend leads her into unexpectedly dangerous circumstances in this dark comedy. It's been close a decade since French intelligence agent Irene (Juliette Binoche) has heard from her friend Elliot (Nick Nolte), an American CIA operative who left Europe and took up a new identity under mysterious circumstances. But one day out of the blue Irene gets a call from Elliot as he asks her to track down his daughter Orlando (Sara Forestier), currently living in the French countryside, and bring her to Paris so they can re-connect. Irene agrees, but she soon discovers Orlando has nothing good to say about her missing dad and only grudgingly agrees to pay him a visit. When they arrive in Paris, Irene and Orlando find the family reunion is bigger than they thought -- David (Tom Riley), Elliot's stepson, is also on hand, though David and Orlando mix like oil and water. As Elliot tries to juggle meetings with his two children and Irene tries to help by playing interference, Elliot is also visited by a deranged American intelligence representative, William Pound (John Turturro), who along with Elliot knows something about a possible attack on the United States, as well as a pair of shadowy moneymen (Mathieu Demy and Said Amadis) who want to know more about the plot and are willing to pay for the privilege. Quelques Jours En Septembre (aka A Few Days In September) was the first directorial credit for veteran screenwriter Santiago Amigorena.

Product Details

Release Date: 09/11/2007
UPC: 0741952312499
Original Release: 2006
Source: Koch Lorber Films
Presentation: [Wide Screen]
Sound: [Dolby Digital Stereo]
Time: 1:52:00

Special Features

Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Juliette Binoche Irène
John Turturro William Pound
Sara Forestier Orlando
Tom Riley David
Nick Nolte Elliot
Mathieu Demy Young Banker
Said Amadis Older Banker

Technical Credits
Santiago Amigorena Director,Screenwriter
Isabelle Baudry Costumes/Costume Designer
Christophe Beaucarne Cinematographer
Paulo Branco Producer
Emmanuelle Duplay Art Director,Production Designer
Laurent Martin Score Composer
Nicolas Picard Production Manager
Sarah Turoche Editor
Brieuc Vanderswaim Asst. Director
François Waledish Sound/Sound Designer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Few Days in September
1. Orlando and David [13:25]
2. A Setback for Pound [6:42]
3. Call From Elliot [6:01]
4. Café [8:33]
5. Train to Venice [9:22]
6. Three-Day Delay [8:13]
7. Cultural Observations [5:59]
8. "A Risky Job" [14:40]
9. Tiger, Tiger [15:02]
10. In the Crosshairs [19:37]
11. Staying Together [5:17]
12. End Credits [2:29]

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A Few Days in September 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Quelques jours en septembre (A Few Days in September) is an intelligent, classy little film that boasts not only a unique story as written and directed by Argentinean Santiago Amigorena, but a fine cast of both seasoned and fresh young actors who capture our attention and hearts as they progress through Europe on a mission that has a lot to do (in 2001) with September's indelible imprint on the world. It is a film that contains biting humor, black humor, love interests, and bizarre sidebars that make the final moments of the movie all the more troubling. Irène Montano (Juliette Binoche) is an agent in Paris who is somehow connected to secret intelligence in making a meeting with one CIA agent Elliott (Nick Nolte) who holds top-secret information that could change the world... Irène is instructed by cellphone to look after Elliott's estranged French daughter Orlando (Sara Forestier), who loathes the father that deserted her when her mother died, and Elliot's young son David (Tom Riley) from the US who adores his father and has come to Paris to see him. Various meeting places between Irène (accompanied by Orlando and David) and Elliot are aborted until finally the three are told to travel to Venice for a definite meeting. This all takes place between September 5th and September 10th and it is soon suggested that the elusive Intelligence Service Elliott hold information that will impact the world. As the three characters progress through the streets and cafes of Paris and of Venice they are stalked by a very odd assassin William Pound (John Turturro) who divides his time among reciting poetry, in cellphone consultations with his psychiatrist, killing people and planning the assassination of Elliott. While Orlando and David are at first at odds, separated by language and by disparate feelings about their shared father, the presence of Irène joins the two in friendship and more while acting as a guide and escort through the dangers that lie constantly before them. It is not until the last few minutes of the film that we actually meet Elliott (Nolte) and in these few minutes not only are there changes that occur in the estranged relationship between Orlando and Elliot, but also rapid fire events that breathlessly lead to the moments before the shattering events of 911 in America. Cinematographer Christophe Beaucarne captures all of the allure of Paris and Venice while keeping the focus of the film intense with well-lighted spaces and camera angles. Laurent Martin has found the right mixture of music types to fit the various moods of the film - from amorous to innocent to terror. The film is in both English and French (subtitled in English) and it is refreshing for a groups of actors to move so graciously between the languages. Binoche is in peak form, creating a fascinating woman whose role is so very pivotal to the entire story. John Turturro adds another character role to his repertoire and provides most of the dark humor that peppers the film. Nolte is strong in his small role, but it is the pleasure of watching newcomers Tom Riley and Sara Forestier, so adroit at being natural, that adds to the success of the movie. While the topic of the film (911) is still difficult to assimilate, this version of how Europe was responding and the suggestion of how our own CIA had prior information make for a seamlessly exciting way of filling in some of the holes that remain to be examined. Strongly recommended on all levels. Grady Harp