Blue Velvet

Blue Velvet

DVD (Wide Screen)

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Blue Velvet 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Blue Velvet' isn't as surreal or as hard to follow as 'Lost Highway'. Its not as subversive or demanding as 'Mullholland Drive'. But it does beautifully display the constant themes, reoccuring imagery and distinct 'something is not right' feeling that epitomizes David Lynch's work, and as such makes it an excellent introduction into what David Lynch's art is all about. Lynch gained subtlety in his later years, so when - within the first opening scenes of the film - a stark and obvious comparison is made to the picture-perfect suburban lifestyle versus the seething, alien dark life below it, don't worry. You're not going to be spoon-fed the points Lynch is trying to make in this movie - it just feels like spoon-feeding when compared to what Lynch demands of his audience in later works. However, if Blue Velvet is your first exposure to Lynch, this is probably a good thing. The synopsis, if it is needed, runs like this: Quiet college boy Jeffery comes home when his father has a stroke and ends up in the hospital. He's quickly drawn into a darker side of his hometown when he discovers a severed ear in an empty field. A detective's daughter, Sandy, gives him overheard info that the police have been watching the apartment of Dorothy Vallance, a local nightclub singer. When Jeffery (rather naively, one suspects) takes the investigation into his own hands, he discovers the thrills of voyeurism, is molested at knifepoint by Dorothy, witnesses Dorothy's brutalization, objectification and pseudo-rape at the hands of Frank Booth (also kidnapper for Dorothy's husband and son, said husband being the source of the severed ear), and finally is pulled into becoming an active participant in this dark situation when he succumbs to Dorothy's pleas to beat her while they have sex. The rest of the film follows Jeffery's further investigation into Frank (propelled by his heightening interest in Dorothy), his subsequent full-blown trip into Frank's hellacious world, and his emergence into the role of victorious hero at the film's climax. Plot-wise, as earlier mentioned, Blue Velvet takes a pretty clear shot at the story (although the extent of supporting characters' involvement in the crimes in question is never fully explained). If you don't think so, try watching 'Lost Highway' and then see what kind of 3rd grade primer 'Blue Velvet' is by comparison. Scattered throughout are the delicious visual snapshots that Lynch is rightly famous for - Dean Stockwell lip-synching into a lightbulb to Roy Orbinson's 'In Dreams', the artificial poses of the yellow man and Dorothy's husband at the film's final showdown, Frank huffing off an oxygen mask while staring intently at Dorothy's genetalia (shot off-center, as if seen by a completely unattached observer). When the world of the sane and rational sits cheek to cheek with the insane and irrational, the only way to reconcile the two seems to be in dreams, and the dreamlike quality of many of the scenes leading to the final 'happy ending' have become the visual signature to Lynch's work. The problem is, Jeffery's emergence back into the world of light and reason seems a little...premature. Jeffery has discovered the other side of the coin, and the problem about discovering things is that you can't un-discover them later. While the ending implies a rosy future with sweet-as-pie Sandy (a total innocent in a Lynch movie, where there are rarely any truly innocent people), I couldn't help but wonder how long it would take Jeffery to start crusing the dark alleyways of his hometown, stopping in to visit Ben the pimp, inhaling the gas from whipped cream canisters, or maybe striking Sandy in a fit of sexual impulse. Innocence, once lost, is gone for good. Not to say that I was completely disappointed by the ending. For newcomers to Lynch, the film serves as a fitting baptism - it ducks you under the water long enough to see what lives in the darkness, but pulls you back up into
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was impressed the first time I saw it. This time I wanted to watch it twice. Another movie by David Lynch would be terrific.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very twisted and sordid movie. David lynch is in top form here as he pushes the envelope of good taste. His movies always keep you on your toes and if you get up out of your chair, you're bound to miss something. Don't miss it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Lynch is to be heartily congratulated for delivering a film so nightmarishly real you will wonder if you are dreaming with your eyes open. What I liked about this book was its unflinching honesty about sexual perversion. It's all in here. One of most intriguing characters in the film is Ben (played by Dean Stockwell). He is portrayed as an autogynephilic transsexual with sadistic tendencies (he wears copious make up, and ever so suavely punches handsome young Jeffrey in the stomach). It's interesting that an art house film could deal with this topic (autogynephlia, transsexuality) years before autogynephilia even had a name, and years before the publication of books like The Man Who Would Be Queen (J. Michael Bailey), which describe the main types of transsexuality. This is only more evidence of the the genius of Blue Velvet.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dennis Hopper gave a great performance as Frank Booth. The character was 50% scary and perverse and 50% wierd and hilarious. He should have gotten nominated for Best Actor.
ValeretFields More than 1 year ago
Blue Velvet, written and directed by David Lynch and starring Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, Kyle MacLaughlan and Laura Dern, follows a young man's discovery of a severed ear in a seemingly quiet town. He then discovers many secrets hidden within the town. It is a depiction of corruption beneath the presentation of a nice community. Lynch is a master at what he does and the cast is very interesting to watch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This movie shows all characteristics better than any other movie known to me as being a noir film, and is one of the easier Lynch movies to follow. Don't be turned off by the cheesy begining Lynch meant it to be this way to show what a boring life they had before the mystery began (entered the ear). It touches on how there is a dark underbelly all around us its just sometimes hard to see, and Jeffrey doesnt understand why people like Frank (dennis hopper) exist until he becomes part of the dark world by hittin Dorothy himself. This shows him anyone could essentially be an evil person at night and live a normal everyday life. If your into noir or suspense/mystery films your crazy to pass this movie up.
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