Frenzy

Frenzy

Director: Alfred Hitchcock Cast: Jon Finch, Barry Foster, Barbara Leigh-Hunt
4.2 4

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Frenzy 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Frenzy is Hitchcock's lost masterpiece. The film is a return to his work that made him a genius in the art of character and camera creativity. The actors respond to his direction with momentum that cannot be slowed. The film is more intense than Psycho and more fluid than Vertigo. Definetly well worth watching over and over.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A marvelous suspense film with a taut screenplay by Anthony Shaffer, "Frenzy" turned out to be Hitchcock's best film in years with a flawless cast of non-stars. The wrong man becomes the chief suspect when his ex-wife is murdered--we've seen this plot before but Hitchcock, the master, keeps the pace spinning with humor and invention. It's a Hitchcockian nightmare in which an innocent man is accused and arrested of a murder he did not commit. It has some of the most unbearably suspenseful scenes since "Psycho", with just the right amount of wry, macabre bits of humor to take a bit off the edge of the horror. Hitchcock's Englishness has always had a powerful grip on him. With "Frenzy", we are nearly back in the days of his great English films--"The Man Who Knew Too Much", "The 39 Steps", "Secret Agent", "Sabotage", "Young and Innocent", "The Lady Vanishes". The aging Hitchcock's accomplishment in "Frenzy" is astonishing, coming after the sub par quality of "Torn Curtain" and the financial failure of "Topaz". This sense of nationality always gave his English work a pungency and a warm swiftness. He was lucky to have drawn on Shaffer to do "Frenzy's" sly screenplay, not to speak of a cast of first-rate, well-equated actors pretty much unknown outside of England, so that audiences have no perceptions about which actors are the stars and therefore unkillable. Maybe going back to England revived something of his technical energy and sharpened his famous cutting edge of his sense of family combat. His superb balance of the ordinary and extraordinary again reminded us of how much he still deserved the name of master, and how well a master could entertain. [filmfactsman]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago