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I Stand Alone
     

I Stand Alone

5.0 2
Director: Gaspar Noé

Cast: Philippe Nahon, Frankye Pain, Blandine Lenoir

 
Gaspar Noe's I Stand Alone comes to DVD with a widescreen transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. The French soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. English subtitles are accessible. There are no supplemental materials of any consequence, but this Strand Releasing title should be worthwhile for any French film enthusiast.

Overview

Gaspar Noe's I Stand Alone comes to DVD with a widescreen transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. The French soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. English subtitles are accessible. There are no supplemental materials of any consequence, but this Strand Releasing title should be worthwhile for any French film enthusiast.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
A grim portrait of disaffection and loneliness, Gaspar Noe's I Stand Alone is a movie clearly conceived to make a stir. With an armed, frustrated, and hate-filled time bomb at its center, it unabashedly recalls Taxi Driver, offering its own nihilistic spin on Martin Scorsese's masterpiece of urban anomie and redemption. For a feature debut, it's unbelievably daring. Noe doesn't shy away from sprucing up his familiar story with Godard-ian flourishes, including occasional intertitles, a torrent of offscreen narration, and even a warning to the audience to leave before the wrenching finale. A more jarring conceit is the frequent use of abrupt cuts and fast dollies, accompanied by gunshots on the soundtrack. Genuinely startling and somewhat misconceived, the distracting device nonetheless goes some way toward evoking the volatile mindset of the protagonist. The movie shines a light on the circumstances that breed fascist and racist impulses. As politics, it isn't terribly illuminating: Its depiction of underclass, xenophobic rage is shocking in its brutality but hardly revelatory in its insight. As a psychological interrogation, it's more compelling, plunging the viewer into the mind of a disturbed man without sugarcoating. It's this brazen willingness to shove something so repellent in its audience's face that makes I Stand Alone both a courageous movie and an unpleasant experience. Whether the movie is genuinely probing or merely preoccupied with provocation is up for debate. What's not is the movie's visceral impact: This unrelenting essay about a lumpen brute sticks with you, despite -- or perhaps because of -- its lacerating bleakness.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/05/2001
UPC:
0712267990528
Original Release:
1998
Rating:
NR
Source:
Strand Home Video
Presentation:
[Letterbox]
Time:
1:33:00
Sales rank:
26,893

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Intro [:18]
2. Morality [1:35]
3. Prologue: Carne [3:25]
4. Contempt [6:24]
5. Death Opens No Doors [11:04]
6. Rage [11:35]
7. Flesh [13:20]
8. Respect [19:05]
9. My Daughter [18:53]
10. End Titles [3:13]

Customer Reviews

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I Stand Alone 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Seul Contre Tous is not a pleasant film to watch. It's bleak, dark, and probably the most nihilistsic film I've ever seen, with a lone main character that makes 'Taxi Driver''s Travis Bickle look downright chipper. I use 'Taxi Driver' as an example because the comparison is apt. Both films feature roaming, loner main characters flailing blindly through life and, for the most part, hating themselves. Where Bickle's angst is first aimed at general society, he eventually directs his angst at the local scum. I Stand Alone's 'butcher' rails against everyone, including himself, but eventually targets his loved ones, including his daughter, in a very disturbing but oddly moving moment of the film. A continuance of Gaspar Noe's earlier short feature, 'Carne', this film pulls no punches and is an extremely dark ride into the mind of a very disturbed man. Gaspar Noe's unconventional directing style is as jolting as Nahon's performance, which keeps the film to mostly internal monologue and brutal jump-cuts. It's wholly a magnificent film, but one that leaves harrowing afterthoughts, much like Noe's last film, 'Irreversible'. Watch it, marvel in it, and take a shower.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago