Letters from Iwo Jima

Letters from Iwo Jima

Director: Clint Eastwood Cast: Ken Watanabe, Kazunari Ninomiya, Tsuyoshi Ihara
4.6 14

Blu-ray (Wide Screen)

$19.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, November 24 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Letters from Iwo Jima 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Decoration Day or Memorial Day as it is now called is a day set aside to honor those who fought in all of the wars since the Civil War, wars in defense of country and citizens. While we languish over the misbegotten war on Iraq it is helpful to view the Clint Eastwood film LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA and visit the mindset of the 'enemy' - the soldiers pointing weapons our way - in an attempt to understand the global effect of war on the battlefield. Eastwood wisely pairs his disappointing 'Flags of our Fathers', which addressed the political 'war games' simultaneously with the combat on a small Japanese island in World War II, with a 'look at the other side' viewpoint. The same type of militarism, blind faith in the war machine, brutality, fear of dying, bonding among friends, the spectrum of 'good officers versus cruel inflexible officers, and the spectrum of humanity is equalized and the result is a moving drama that sheds needed light on how 'war' is a universal beast no matter one's stance. The telling of the story with occasional letter contents is sound if somewhat over long. The screenplay by Iris Yamashita and Paul Haggis is based on Tadamichi Kuribayashi's "Picture Letters from Commander in Chief" - Kuribayashi (Ken Watanabe) being the film's chief character. Watanabe is excellent in his well-rounded approach to the role of the 'good commander' in both his wise military judgment and his kindness bestowed on the simplest of soldiers such as Saigo (the sensitive Kazunari Ninomiya). For many of us this is the first encounter with the vantage that the Japanese were minimally supplied and supported in defending their sacred Iwo Jima against the American aggressors: the battle was a doomed last stand for the Japanese despite all the casualties suffered by both sides. Eastwood does away with the 'kamikazi' stereotype of the Japanese soldier and allows us to see them as human beings, away form home, fighting to defend their country and their honor. No one is right in war: circumstances and places vary from Europe, the Far East, the Middle East and here but horrors remain the same. It is good to be reminded of this, as in LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA, especially on Memorial Day. Grady Harp
Guest More than 1 year ago
This movie is one of the greatest films directed by Mr. Eastwood. I highly reccomend this movie to those who have already seen "Flags of our Fathers".
kenKV More than 1 year ago
This movie is so excellent.  Thumb up!  I give five stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago