MacArthur Park

MacArthur Park

Director: Billy Wirth Cast: Thomas Jefferson Byrd, Brandon Adams, B-Real
5.0 2

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Overview

MacArthur Park

Playwright Tyrone Atkins lost a promising career in theater and film -- as well as his home, his belongings, and (for a time) his freedom -- when he became addicted to crack cocaine. After conquering his habit, Atkins used his experiences living on the streets as the basis for this story about a group of homeless addicts attempting to hold on to the last shreds of their dignity. Cody (Thomas Jefferson Byrd) was once a respected jazz musician, but after getting hooked on crack, Cody abandoned his wife and son and now lives in a makeshift hut in Los Angeles's MacArthur Park. Cody scrapes up enough money to feed his habit through petty crime and acting as a go-between for more privileged users willing to pay a premium to him rather than hunt down hard-nosed dealer Freddie (B-Real). Cody's friend Blackie (Miguel Nunez) gets along in much the same way, but he finds himself in hot water after he takes off with the money of downwardly mobile TV actor Steve (Balthazar Getty), who gave him a handful of cash to score drugs for him. Cody is forced to take a long look at his responsibilities when he's confronted by his son Terry (Brandon Adams), whom he hasn't seen in years; Cody also runs into Karen (Rachel Hunter), once a fellow addict, who wants him to know there is a way out of the cycle of addiction. MacArthur Park's supporting cast also includes Julie Delpy, Lori Petty, Ellen Cleghorne, David Faustino, Sticky Fingaz, and Sydney Tamia Poitier, while R&B star Macy Gray contributed to the soundtrack; the film was enthusiastically received in its screenings at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival.

Product Details

Release Date: 05/18/2004
UPC: 0758445904925
Original Release: 2001
Rating: R
Source: Showtime Ent.
Time: 1:28:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; Commentary with director Billy Wirth, writer Tyrone Atkins, and actor Thomas Jefferson Byrd; The Making of MacArthur Park; U.S. trailer; Letterbox format

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Thomas Jefferson Byrd Actor
Brandon Adams Actor
B-Real Actor
Badazz Actor
Ellen Cleghorne Actor
Julie Delpy Actor
David Faustino Actor
Balthazar Getty Actor
Rachel Hunter Actor
Miguel A. Nuñez Actor
Lori Petty Actor
Glenn Plummer Actor
Sydney Tamiia Poitier Actor
Alexia Robinson Actor
Sticky Fingaz Actor
Kirk Taylor Actor
Carlton Wilborn Actor
Cynda Williams Actor

Technical Credits
Billy Wirth Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Kristian Bernier Cinematographer
Aaron Courseault Screenwriter
Alan Harris Executive Producer
Cydney McCurdy Casting
Robi Reed Casting
Robi Reed-Humes Executive Producer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Main Titles [2:41]
2. I Need a Blast [4:14]
3. White Boy in a Limousine [3:37]
4. Can I Help You, Brother? [4:51]
5. Need to Get in the Studio [4:24]
6. Park Sweep [3:39]
7. Somebody Stole My S*** [4:20]
8. After Dark [4:15]
9. Excuses [6:42]
10. An Invitation [4:40]
11. Hollywood Party [5:47]
12. Mixing Magic at the Hotel [3:38]
13. Action! [5:08]
14. This TV's Mine [4:57]
15. Out of the Hospital [3:53]
16. Home Movies [3:48]
17. Tragedy in the Alley [5:31]
18. A New Beginning [2:34]
19. End Credits [5:32]

Customer Reviews

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MacArthur Park 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Though some may find this insightful, factual story disturbing, it had to be told. Director, Billy Wirth's exceptional revelation of the many struggles homeless people face is admirable. His moving commentary exhibits his humanitarian efforts and clearly shows that with guidance despair can reverse to success. MacArthur Park should be seen by everyone and perhaps there will be more like Billy Wirth who can help bring an end to the homeless problems.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Watching this film broke my heart. I know these people, and find myself hoping that they will somehow find a way out. But as the movie progresses they all just seem to find deeper ways in. They are not saints, but they aren't monsters either. They are lost souls and for me they each are painfully human and achingly flawed.