×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Night Watch
     

Night Watch

4.3 12
Director: Timur Bekmambetov

Cast: Konstantin Khabensky, Vladimir Menshov, Valery Zolotukhin

 

See All Formats & Editions

Two bands of warriors, one good and one evil, battle to keep the peace in Moscow in this cat's cradle thriller from Russia. In 1342, the Warriors of Light (led by Gesser, Lord of Light) and the Warriors of Darkness (led by Zavulon, General of Darkness) declare a truce under which each side will form a law enforcement team to monitor the other side's activities. The

Overview

Two bands of warriors, one good and one evil, battle to keep the peace in Moscow in this cat's cradle thriller from Russia. In 1342, the Warriors of Light (led by Gesser, Lord of Light) and the Warriors of Darkness (led by Zavulon, General of Darkness) declare a truce under which each side will form a law enforcement team to monitor the other side's activities. The Warriors of Light, who enforce the powers of good, patrol the Night Watch, while the Warriors of Darkness, who openly embrace evil, staff the Day Watch. Each watch group also contains "Others," mortals with supernatural powers from both sides that include vampires, shapeshifters, witches, and the like. Prophecy suggests that one day, a Great One will surface and permanently extinguish the threat of an apocalyptic war between the two sides by upsetting the balance, lending greater power to either good or evil (depending on his or her choice) and thus determining the future of mankind forever. In 1992, Night Watch member and Warrior of Light Anton Gordesky (Konstantin Khabensky) discovers he's an "other" amid a sting on a witch. Cut to twelve years later. In 2004, Anton still works the Night Watch, but now he's a vampiric warrior who drinks blood. One night, while on patrol, he rescues a young boy named Egor (Dima Martinov) from a handful of Dark Warriors, but in the process, he encounters Svetlana (Maria Poroshina), a woman who acts as a "funnel" -- a conduit for the powers of evil. Anton reflects on the prophecy regarding "The Great One," and begins to suspect that Svetlana and Egor may be harbingers of this fateful event. As the first installment in a Russian trilogy, Night Watch (aka Nochnoj Dozor) was a massive box-office success in its native Russia, and is followed by the second installment, Day Watch; it was released in the U.S. with a heavy prologue and epilogue, and animated subtitles that alternately scuttle across the screen, dissolve, shudder, and explode. 20th Century Fox not only purchased United States distribution rights for the film, but also announced plans for a Westernized remake.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
This stylish, Russian-made horror-fantasy -- the first in an expected trilogy -- relies on a narrative device employed in the Underworld franchise. It posits an ancient, apocalyptic battle between the forces of Good and Evil that ended in a draw, and resulted in an uneasy but long-lasting truce between Light and Darkness. The story proper begins in post-Cold War Moscow, where an "Other" is born, destined to shift the balance of power. The task of ensuring that the balance is maintained falls to a Warrior of Light, Anton (Konstantin Khabensky). Night Watch employs the relatively recent fright-film conceit that vampires can be either good or evil; the motivations and allegiances of some characters are as murky as the gritty urban settings. The action sequences, meanwhile, are startlingly violent and imaginatively staged -- one combatant removes his own spine and uses it as a club. The all-Russian cast doesn't include any familiar faces, but the performers are uniformly professional and, allowing for the plot's supernatural elements, quite convincing. Definitely leaning toward the avant-garde, Night Watch provides a somewhat different spin on the genre's vampires-versus-demons sub-genre and merits serious consideration by horror fans.
All Movie Guide
Russian cinema could not have returned with a greater bang. Largely dormant since the fall of the Soviet Union, the Russian film industry received a huge goose of credibility with Night Watch, a relentlessly stylish vampire movie that proves that the vampire genre has not yet been sucked dry. But Timur Bekmambetov's film is not cutting edge merely for its music video kinetics; it boasts such a revolutionary concept for subtitle design, Russian audiences ought to rent the English DVD release just to get the full viewing experience. Impressively, the subtitles are treated as an active pictorial element in the gothic proceedings, as the English words sometimes appear typed out in bursts with the dialogue, other times dissolve into smoke, or quiver with a disturbance in the soundtrack. It all adds to an enthralling vampire story that's simple enough not to confuse most audiences, but enough of a labyrinth to please viewers thirsting for mythology. Bekmambetov's world posits an uneasy truce between daywalking and nightwalking vampires, imagining their age-old rivalry as naturally evolving into a modern-day bureaucratic impasse. This is an excellent jumping off point to witness the unraveling of that agreement, with vampires moving in and out of a middle plane of existence called "the gloom," ready to pounce. The exquisite details of the Night Watch world are too many to enumerate, but they include prophecies, shape shifters, telepathic mind control, large flocks of birds, swooping cameras, quick edits, and all the blood dripping from chins you could want. The film's effectiveness is all the more unlikely given the climate at the time of its release, when vampire movies had bombarded multiplexes like the 21st century's answer to Quentin Tarantino ripoffs. That Night Watch accomplishes what it does under such unique circumstances is a testament to its singularity.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/20/2006
UPC:
0024543237488
Original Release:
2004
Rating:
R
Source:
Fox Searchlight
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen, Color]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
1:54:00
Sales rank:
41,724

Special Features

Closed Caption; Extended ending with optional commentary by co-writer/director Timur Bekmambetov; Subtitled commentary (in English, French or Spanish) by renowned novelist Sergei Lukyanenko; A sneak peek at the upcoming Night Watch sequels

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Konstantin Khabensky Anton Gorodetsky
Vladimir Menshov Boris Gesser
Valery Zolotukhin Kostya's Father
Maria Poroshina Svetlana
Galina Tyunina Olga
Viktor Verzhbitsky Zavulon
Gosha Kutsenko Ignat
Aleksei Chadov Kostya
Zhanna Friske Alisa
Ilya Larutenko Andrei
Rimma Markova Darya, Witch
Mariya Mironova Irina
Dima Martynov Egor
Alexei Maklakov Semyon
Anna Dubrovskaya Larissa
Ilia Lagutenko Andrei
Alexandre Samoilenko Bear
Anna Sliu Tiger Cub
Sergei Prikhodko Peter
Igor Savochkin Maxim Ivanovich
Yegor Dronov Tolik
Nikolai Olyalin Inquistor
Dmitry Klokov Actor
Dmitry Osetrov Actor
Konstantin Murzenko Actor
Anatoly Gorin Actor
Liudmila Aronova Actor
Alexander Shchurok Actor
Nikolai Kiselev Actor
Marina Ivanova Actor
Vitia Ivanov Actor
Polina Shchurok Actor
Tatiana Shchankina Actor
Alexander Kozlov Actor
Igor Pismenny Actor
Victoria Smirnova Actor
Sergei Kalashnikov Actor
Ekaterina Malikova Actor
Vladik Anufriyev Actor
Yura Yakovlev Actor
Vania Popov Actor
Liesha Kurochkin Actor
Yarik Romashenko Actor
Yulia Korpacheva Singer
Alexander Vedernikov Conductor

Technical Credits
Timur Bekmambetov Director,Screenwriter
V. D. Akulshin Songwriter
Alexander Anshiutu Stunts
Varvara Avdyushko Executive Producer
Yury Barinov Stunts
Igor Besov Stunts
Natalya Bogdanova Makeup
Roman Boiko Cinematographer
Igor Bondarenko Producer
Oleg Borisenko Stunts
Eduard Bougaichuk Stunts
Alexei Buinov Stunts
Konstantin Demakhin Stunts
Ekaterina Diminskaya Costumes/Costume Designer
Vyacheslav Dobrynin Songwriter
Konstantin Ernst Producer
Eduard Fedashko Stunts
Maxim Fesiun Art Director
Valentin Fidorouk Cinematographer
Andrei Golikov Animator
Sergei Golubev Stunts
Alexander Gorokhov Asst. Director
Andrei Grigoriev Stunts
Andrei Grozny Songwriter
Sergei Gushchin Stunts
Laeta Kalogridis Screenwriter
Boris Karelin Stunts
Ilia Karelin Stunts
Sergei Karpenko Sound/Sound Designer
Tikhon Khrennikov Songwriter
Dmitri Kiselev Editor
Ruslan Klemenov Stunts
Dmitry Kozhin Animator
Vladimir Krestovsky Songwriter
Alexsei Kublistki Executive Producer
Valentin Kudriavtsev Animator
Alexander Kuliamin Stunts
Andrei Lepilin Stunts
Sergei Luk'yanenko Screenwriter
Vladimir Maliugin Stunts
Anatoly Maximov Producer
Alexei Melnikov Animator
Mukhtar Mirzakeyev Art Director
Irina Morozova Makeup
Andrei Nikolayev Stunts
Tamara Odinstova Casting
Alexei Pashin Stunts
Alexei Potapov Stunts
Yuri Poteyenko Score Composer
Vladimir Pushkariev Cinematographer
Alexander Rakov Stunts
Alexei Sefin Stunts
Vitaly Seregin Stunts
Sergei Shnurov Songwriter
Sergei Sholokhov Stunts
Sergei Shubin Songwriter
Andrei Shurdakov Stunts
Mikhail Sladko Stunts
Ekaterina Sokolova Animator
Dmitry Tarasenko Stunts
Sergei Trofimov Cinematographer
Tury Tsilin Animator
Galina Ustimenko Makeup
Valery Viktorov Art Director
Alexei Vorobiev Stunts
Vara Yavdyushko Production Designer
Mikhail Yedelkin Animator
Vladimir Yelin Stunts
Prokhor Zikora Stunts
Sergei Zotkin Stunts

Scene Index

Disc #1, Side A -- Night Watch (English Version)
1. The Others [3:59]
2. Black Magic [2:48]
3. Calling Yegor [4:05]
4. The Butcher [2:47]
5. On the Subway [2:07]
6. Captured [3:37]
7. Power of Light [:52]
8. Healing Anton [3:53]
9. Cursed Virgin [2:59]
10. Bloodthirst [1:02]
11. Olga [4:53]
12. Olga Transforms [:44]
13. In the Cyclone [4:14]
14. Not Afraid [1:52]
15. Irina's Child [:32]
16. Bad News [3:06]
17. Lured [3:39]
18. Forgive Me [3:24]
19. Rooftop Battle [3:21]
20. The Great Other [4:26]
Disc #1, Side B -- Night Watch (Russian Version)
1. The Others [3:59]
2. Black Magic [2:48]
3. Calling Yegor [4:05]
4. The Butcher [2:47]
5. On the Subway [2:07]
6. Captured [3:37]
7. Power of Light [:52]
8. Healing Anton [3:53]
9. Cursed Virgin [2:59]
10. Bloodthirst [1:02]
11. Olga [4:53]
12. Olga Transforms [:44]
13. In the Cyclone [4:14]
14. Not Afraid [1:52]
15. Irina's Child [:32]
16. Bad News [3:06]
17. Lured [3:39]
18. Forgive Me [3:24]
19. Rooftop Battle [3:21]
20. The Great Other [4:26]

Videos

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Night Watch 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Idonthavenomoney More than 1 year ago
Don't Watch
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The unique visual style is very refreshing to watch, even for someone who has to read the English subtitles since the subtitles are displayed and used very creatively whenever possible. The premise obviously does not offer the broadest demographic appeal, but it does make for a creative story. There are a few times when some of the more subtle plot points can be a little hard to pick up on, but that won't prevent anyone from enjoying the film. Solid performances by all of the actors also help make this an entertaining film. It couldn't win an Oscar, but you'll probably find yourself wanting more when the credits start to roll.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Actin packed, edgy, excellent vampire flick with a unique and dark vision. I loved the performances, the sets, the plot, the concept, and it is all so simple, but layered in complexity. It isn't as eerie as Torchwood, but I bought it. The eidting was masterful. The DP was A+! I am awaiting book 3 and the movie!
Guest More than 1 year ago
And after that it went all over the place. A lot of viewers stand correct on this film regarding its up’s and downs to this film. There are a number of movies you can describe this to. To me personally it was a blend of ‘The Matrix’ (whichever one you choose but preferable part one) with ‘Constantine,’ add a good helping of vampire lore and a dash of Christian symbolism, and to throw in a stolid, overt stance on abortion. That probably is ‘Night Watch’ done in one hour and fifty four minutes. It’s hard to believe that this film was only done with $4 million, that’s like pocket change compare to other production cost out there. To explain “Night Watch’ in its entirety would be pointless, only raising more question than answers. Then afterwards you would be looking at this review like I’m crazy. The essentials of ‘Night Watch’ go a little like this: The armies of light and dark have come to an age-old Truce. Upholding the Truce is the Night Watch and the Day Watch. Light watches during nighttime and Dark watches during daytime. Only ‘Others’ are aware of the Truce and its armies, and ‘Others’ must decide at their awakening which side to choose (sort of like Star Wars). Legend states that one day a child will be born that decides the fate of the two armies, depending on which side the child chooses. The hero being Anton Gorodetsky (Konstantin Khabensky), an alcoholic blood-sucker whose awakening came at the hands of a long-distance Dark assassin (you'll understand once you seen it). His denomination is Light, but he has secret inklings of temptation, despite his role as a Night Watchman. To continue on with this would only confuse you more. It’s been a while since I shoke my head so much with a questionable look on my face on a film. I also felt that they could have done a way better job towards the ending. The Sub-plots fizzle and the climax kind of fell short but I guess filmmakers intended it that way for the rest of the trilogy. Bekamambetov hasn’t confused me too much for me to abandon his epic, but I’ll probably have a better understanding when the rest comes if I do choose to watch it. If you’re curious about this film and into Horror/Action/ Fantasy, then by all means give it a try.
Anais1999 More than 1 year ago
As usual, there are certain things that are lost in translation, but I am fortunate enough to be able to ignore the subtitles and concentrate on the movie itself. Plus, there are certain hints and nods toward Russian and Soviet cultures and politics that one won't be able to understand (or perhaps to even notice) without having lived there for years (or, even better, being born there). I watched both movies (Day Watch and Night Watch) and read all 4 books in the series (Day Watch, Night Watch, Dawn Watch and Last Watch). As it is often the case, I liked books better than movies. However, I think the cast is brilliant - I couldn't ask for better Gesser or Zavulon (or Anton, or Svetlana, or the whole vampire family, or...).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago