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Bank
     

The Bank

4.0 1
Director: Robert Connolly

Cast: David Wenham, Anthony LaPaglia, Mitchell Butel

 

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A young man fascinated with the workings of the world of banking forms an alliance with an unscrupulous corporate predator in this drama. Jim Doyle (David Wenham) developed an interest in finance while he was a young boy growing up in a small Australian town, and as an adult he and his partners have developed BTSE (Bank Training Simulation Experiment), a sophisticated

Overview

A young man fascinated with the workings of the world of banking forms an alliance with an unscrupulous corporate predator in this drama. Jim Doyle (David Wenham) developed an interest in finance while he was a young boy growing up in a small Australian town, and as an adult he and his partners have developed BTSE (Bank Training Simulation Experiment), a sophisticated computer program that can anticipate the ups and downs of the world's money markets. Jim's program attracts the interest of Simon O'Riley (Anthony LaPaglia), the head of a major Aussie financial services corporation, Centabank; O'Riley is looking to cut costs and increase profits, and he's convinced BTSE can help him do just that. However, O'Riley has other, more aggressive ways of boosting his bottom line; Centabank has been shutting down small-town branch offices that have been faithfully serving customers for decades, and has developed a new enthusiasm for foreclosing on loans from smaller customers having trouble making ends meet. Two such customers are Wayne and Diane Davis (Steve Rodgers and Mandy McElhinney), who obtained a loan to start their own business building houseboats; when the local economy went into a nosedive, the Davises found themselves under the thumb of Centabank, and the bank's hounding of the couple led to an unfortunate accident that took the life of their young son. Determined to make Centabank pay for their son's death, Wayne takes on the corporation with the help of Stephen (Mitchell Buell), an activist lawyer. Jim, meanwhile, becomes romantically involved with Michelle (Sibylla Budd), a Centabank employee, and through her gets a clearer idea of just what O'Riley is trying to do.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Tom Wiener
Movies about high finance always run the risk of boring the audience with more arcane detail than any lay person can absorb in two hours of screen time. The Bank dispenses with trying to educate, favoring atmosphere and psychology over numbers and theories. Artfully animated parabolas under the opening credits suggest that the theories of Jim Doyle (David Wenham) about predicting the money market will be one part Leonardo DaVinci (Doyle likes to draw and doodle on tablecloths) and one part John Nash. As Simon O'Reily, Doyle's employer and sometime nemesis, Anthony LaPaglia gets to recycle a lot of Michael Douglas' Oscar-winning moves and locutions from Wall Street. He's the ultimate corporate shark, puffing on a stogie, bragging about having his foot on the back of Jim's neck as a great motivational tool, and trusting no one. Wenham can't keep up with LaPaglia and doesn't try; anyway, the film seems to be less about rooting for Jim than rooting against Simon. The twin subplots of a couple frustrated by the bank's indifference to their financial and personal losses and a comely fellow employee romancing Jim are good red herrings, though the film's final twist isn't too hard to predict.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/24/2003
UPC:
0717119884345
Original Release:
2001
Rating:
NR
Source:
New Yorker Video
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:43:00

Special Features

Director's commentary; Storyboard sequence (with commentary by director); Cast and director bios; Original theatrical trailer; Scene selections

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
David Wenham Jim Doyle
Anthony LaPaglia Simon O'Reily
Mitchell Butel Stephen
Kazuhiro Muroyama Toshio
Stephen Leeder Billy
Bruce Myles Ben
Vince Gil Sheriff
Sibylla Budd Actor

Technical Credits
Robert Connolly Director,Screenwriter
Alan John Score Composer
Annie Marshall Costumes/Costume Designer
John Maynard Producer
Nicholas Meyers Editor
Tristan Milani Cinematographer
Jane Norris Casting
Sam Petty Sound/Sound Designer
Luigi Pittorino Production Designer
Domenico Procacci Co-producer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Prologue [4:27]
2. Goliath [3:49]
3. The Pitch [6:10]
4. Dummy Run [7:09]
5. Sex and Death [5:20]
6. The Front Line [4:25]
7. Oil and Water [5:01]
8. I Don't Trust Anyone [2:40]
9. I Know What I'm Doing [6:23]
10. An Ultimatum [5:50]
11. Night Moves [4:23]
12. Speed Doubler [5:46]
13. False Witness [8:32]
14. The Board Caves In [4:51]
15. Revelations [7:09]
16. Showdown [8:02]
17. Where Is He? [5:27]
18. Epilogue [1:06]
19. Credits [2:48]

Customer Reviews

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The Bank 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an atmospheric and somewhat suspensful take on the cutthroat world of finance and banking. The plot lines of the budding mathematical genius and the downtrodden borrowers are both interesting, maybe the former a bit more intriguing than the latter. One can't help but get wrapped up in the fascination with whether the computer program can keep up with the tempestuous reality of the stock market. Or maybe I've just been living too close to Microsoft for too long. More than once I wondered why a certain scene was relevant, and each time I was soon rewarded by a new plot development or twist. I am haunted by this film. Make sure to check out all the background bits, the scenery, the props, the artwork. I was also quite intrigued by all the references to fractal geometry.