×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane
     

The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane

3.4 5
Director: Nicolas Gessner

Cast: Jodie Foster, Martin Sheen, Alexis Smith

 

See All Formats & Editions

In this Canadian thriller, Jodie Foster plays the title character, a reclusive, fiercely self-reliant teenager who lives alone in her father's house. When visitors call, Foster explains that her father is away on business. He's away, all right...far, far, away. And Foster, determined not to lose her independence, will go to any lengths to protect her secret, a fact

Overview

In this Canadian thriller, Jodie Foster plays the title character, a reclusive, fiercely self-reliant teenager who lives alone in her father's house. When visitors call, Foster explains that her father is away on business. He's away, all right...far, far, away. And Foster, determined not to lose her independence, will go to any lengths to protect her secret, a fact that nosy neighbor Alexis Smith learns to her regret. A new danger to Foster's well-being looms in the form of pedophile Martin Sheen, who schemes to place the girl in a compromising position. Offering a helping hand to Foster is misfit teenager Mario (Scott Jacoby). Laird Koenig adapted his own novel to the screen.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Robert Firsching
An interesting little oddball chiller about a young girl (Jodie Foster) who lives alone with a dark secret. Social workers and all manner of concerned adults stop by to find out why no one ever sees her parents, and much of the film is spent exploring her daily existence bearing the burden of this subterfuge. Of course, many of those who come to visit her never leave the house again, and it all seems to have something to do with whoever - or whatever - is in the cellar. Martin Sheen, in a quietly chilling performance, plays a strange young man with an unusual interest in young girls who stops by to hit on her every so often. Foster is superb as usual, and this is the perfect film for those interested in contemporary scares without buckets of scarlet.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/10/2016
UPC:
0738329179724
Original Release:
1976
Rating:
PG
Source:
Kl Studio Classics
Region Code:
A
Time:
1:31:00
Sales rank:
1,311

Special Features

On camera interview with star Martin Sheen Audio commentary with director Nicolas Gessner Conversation with Martin Sheen and Nicolas Gessner Original trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jodie Foster Rynn
Martin Sheen Frank Hallet
Alexis Smith Mrs. Hallet
Mort Shuman Miglioriti
Scott Jacoby Mario
Dorothy Davis Town Hall Clerk
Clesson Goodhue Bank Manager
Hubert Noel Bank Clerk
Jacques Famery Bank Clerk
Mary Morter Teller
Judie Wildman Teller

Technical Credits
Nicolas Gessner Director
Zev Braun Producer
Ronald Fauteux Set Decoration/Design
Christian Gaubert Score Composer
Harold Greenberg Producer
Denis Heroux Producer
Laird Koenig Screenwriter
Yves Langlois Editor
Eugene Lepicier Producer
Richard S. Lochte Screenwriter
Leland Nolan Producer
Alfred Pariser Producer
Mort Shuman Musical Direction/Supervision
Denis Sperdouklis Costumes/Costume Designer
Valentino Costumes/Costume Designer
René Verzier Cinematographer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
ProfessorTheremin More than 1 year ago
Jodie Foster, as many of you know, started acting as a child; first in commercials, then TV (Here's Lucy, The Brady Bunch), before hitting it big in the movie, Taxi Driver, and the TV version of Paper Moon. In 1976, she made The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane, a taut little tale of suspense made in Canada. More of a "howcatchum" than a "whodunnit", Foster plays an annoyingly stunning teenager living in a small New England town, but for some reason, nobody ever seems to see her parents. Not the landlady (Alexis Smith, from Sondheim's Follies), or her creepy son, played by a very young Martin Sheen. Foster plays her part with a strong independence and maturity. A free thinker when many people still were not. Young Jodie had a brief (back to the camera) nude scene that was always snipped from TV prints. I was understandably surprised to see this scene in the uncut version on this DVD, which shows me that we may have never seen this film the way it was intended, and for this reason, The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane, is a real time capsule, and a significant part of Ms. Foster's body of work. It sits proudly in my DVD collection, inbetween Gerard Damiano's Let My Puppets Come (If you like Comedy Central's Crank Yankers, you will love that film), and Little Shop of Horrors (The original).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What I love about this movie is the performances, all of the actors did a fantastic job, especially Jodie Foster and Marin Sheen. They pulled off strong, believable characters that stuck with you. Still it is rather unnerving, but definitely unforgettable. Not for young children.
fisherDJ More than 1 year ago
I thought this movie was cheesy and boring. I bought it because it has Jodie Foster in it as a young actress and it was worth that as she has talent and it's fun to see who she was then and who she is now.
Bob_G_Trapp More than 1 year ago
Even as a young girl, Jodie Foster had the ability to establish a strong character. In this movie, the character is supposed to be creepy and make you uncomfortable and she is able to pull it off. Paired with Martin Sheen, this movie is very effective. Keep in mind, though, that it is very unnerving.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I remember watching parts of this movie when I was a kid and enjoying it. I saw it at the store and picked it up. It was marked as being rated PG, so I brought it home to share with my family. This movie is NOT a PG movie. The "F" word is used several times and there is nudity. I tried to ignore the language, but when the character was removing clothes to jump in bed for a sex scene, we had to turn it off quickly. This was my first movie purchase from B&N, and will most likely be my last.