The Reader

The Reader

Director: Stephen Daldry Cast: Kate Winslet, Ralph Fiennes, David Kross
4.1 27

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The Reader 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
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ThomasDC More than 1 year ago
I must admit, the first 15 minutes of this movie bored me and I doubted if I could sit and watch without getting up from my couch and wondering around the house. After that, the story while still slow, did begin to capture you and continue to pull. The time progression and relationship between the two main characters comes to an apex in the middle of the film and from that point, you sit mezmarized. This is a gripping tale, finely acted by Kate Winslet and even Ralph Finnes, whom I find ususally to be one dimensional. I would say it was a tough choice for me between Kate and Meryl for Best-Actress for '08, they both do possibly the best "character" leads I have seen them both do. But Kate's character and the story associated with her does stay with you long after the movie has ended...she was superb! This is movie making at its finest. A must have for any DVD collection.
QC-George More than 1 year ago
It is not obvious at first what the "The Reader" has in store for us. In the beginning I thought this movie was going to be about a young boy who reads to an illiterate older woman. It then changes to a story about self Pride and how far one is willing to go to protect her own pride. We can all ask ourselves, would we be willing to do what Hanna Schmitz did to protect her pride? She made a huge sacrifice and paid handsomely because of her decision. The story moves along very nicely and kept my interest through the ending credits. I was amazed at the way her story unfolded and felt empathy for Hanna. Brilliantly told, acted, etc.
docwunderly More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the movie it was thought provoking about the events that transpired during the second world war and the way that some of the German guards felt about the Jewish that they were sent to guard. That they were not thought of as humans so much as cattle, to be driven to slaughter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
what a thriller
Wickedly_Goodkind More than 1 year ago
The Reader was a good solid movie with great performances. I wasn't expecting the graphic nudity, but it was artful and did lend itself to the overall feel of the movie. My eyes rarely left the screen and I was completely immersed in the believability of the story and characters. I do have to admit that the end of the movie left me with a lot of questions. Since the story is seen through the eyes of Michael, the director omitted a conclusive back-story for Hannah and her motivations. If you enjoy good drama, The Boy in Stripped Pajamas or Bent are very good as well.
Minh_from_Helotes More than 1 year ago
Flows well, story is compelling, evocation of holocaust camps is emotional, Kate Winslet is equal to the great actress she always is. The core motivation of Kate's character (I won't reveal it) is heart wrenching and thought provoking. Warning: sad ending.
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Grady1GH More than 1 year ago
THE READER in the form of Bernard Schlink's masterful book made an emotional impact on those who read it. And for once the book to film version holds nearly as much agony and beauty as the original. The screenplay is by David Hare (whose transformation of 'The Hours' was so worthy) and it captures not only the dialogue of Schlink's novel but fills in the silences with well-constructed added commentary. Stephen Daldry ('The Hours', 'Billy Elliot') directs with great sensitivity to not only the narrative story but to the myriad metaphors that fill the quiet spaces in both the novel and the film. Michael Berg (David Kross, a significant discovery!) lives in Berlin, falls ill with Scarlet Fever, and is given shelter from the rain and cold by a stern appearing Hanna (Kate Winslet). When Michael recovers from his illness he returns to Hanna's flat to thank her for her kindness and there begins a strange and beautiful love affair between a virginal shy lad and an older but obviously emotionally flat yet needy woman. Despite Michael's family's disdain for his absences away from home, Michael surrenders himself to the passion of love and Hanna softens as she pleads for Michael to read to her. Reading and sex become exchanges for this rare couple until Hanna disappears. Michael discovers her some ears later when Hanna is on trial for war crimes (she had been a guard in the concentration camps). Hanna allows her guilt to override reality in confessing she had been the one who had written the orders for the extermination of Jews - this despite the fact that Hanna is illiterate, a fact known only to Michael. While Hanna is imprisoned Michael (now Ralph Fiennes) records his reading of books to send to Hanna and during Hanna's twenty years of confinement she learns to read and write because of Michael's efforts and gifts. Once Hanna is scheduled to be released from prison and the prison matron convinces Michael to be in charge of the aging Hanna, the story takes turns and the ending is so gently painful that sharing it would ruin the impact for those who have neither read the book nor seen the film. Winslet, Kross, and Fiennes are excellent in these very difficult roles. Their performances are enhanced with the supporting cast that includes special cameos by Lena Olin and Bruno Ganz and some other fine German actors. The mood of the film is gray except of the isolated moments of bliss Michael and Hanna share and the atmosphere is well balanced by the musical score of Nico Muhly. This is a film worth viewing repeatedly, there are that many layers of meaning to glean from this cinematic triumph. Grady Harp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kate Winslet was FANTASTIC in her Oscar-winning performance in this emotional movie. You will love this movie.