Way Down East

Way Down East

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DVD (B&W)

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4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just happened to watch this movie while I was reading Thomas Hardys Tess of the D'Urbervilles, and by the end it had hit me that the film was loosly bassed off of this classic novel. Sure, lots of things are changed and it is made a bit more wholesome from the version of the nowel we see today. However, the origional publications of the 1891 novel had to be edited from the origonal, what we read today. This version of the story involves a fake marriage rather then a rape and thus a slightly more inocent figure of Tess. This is what the film plays on and. The more that I think about it, the more it is the same. I mean at the begining, Lillian Gish's character Anne, basicly Tess, goes to get some money from rich relatives to help the family farm, and is tricked into a fake marriage which results in pregnacy. Anne's baby dies too, and she even baptizes it in just the way that Tess did. Then Anne goes to work on a religious squires farm where she falls inlove with the angelic son, David. Anne refuses marriage repeatedly and then her secret is dramaticly revealed and she is forced off the farm in the middle of a snow storm. Since it is 1920, of course there is a happy ending, but the mood of the film is the same as in the book. There is even a Mercy chant figure in the form of Davids cousin, whom his parents want him to marry. A very nice film and an interesting subject for Hardy fans. Any one who has read the book may find this story a rather butchered adaptation, but it is not trieing to be the exact story and thus should be veiwed sympatheticly. I do recomend this to those who have read the book though, just for fun.