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Earl's Too Cool for Me
     

Earl's Too Cool for Me

by Leah Komaiko, Laura Cornell (Illustrator)
 

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Earl's the coolest kid in town. He lunches with movie stars and keeps monster eyes in jelly jars. Why would he ever want to play with just a regular kid? Maybe Earl isn't too cool for true friendship.

Overview

Earl's the coolest kid in town. He lunches with movie stars and keeps monster eyes in jelly jars. Why would he ever want to play with just a regular kid? Maybe Earl isn't too cool for true friendship.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In PW 's words, ``Author and illustrator bring humor and rhapsodized zaniness to this story of misconceptions that lead to friendship. . . . The book has superior text, very hip and bright, with a finger-snapping rhythm.'' Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature
Earl's wild imagination takes off with a bicycle made of hay, a rose grown from his fingernails, and swinging with gorillas. Humorous watercolor pictures tell the story by contrasting Earl's imagined escapades with the more normal activities of the other boy: Earl keeps monster eyes in jelly jars while the nameless boy has the usual insects. Earl's bristly blond hair, sunglasses, and flashy shirts contrast with our uncool anti-hero's sleeveless undershirts, round glasses, and hair clips that keep his hair parted in the bath. While the boy decries Earl's exploits, when the boys finally meet, their reactions to each other is the surprise. Given help with some geographical names, this book will appeal to reluctant readers who like a tall tale. Unfortunately, some of the fun is lost by the broken rhythms of the supporting poem. 2003 (orig. 1988), Laura Geringer Books/Harper Trophy/HarperCollins Publishers,
— Carlee Hallman
School Library Journal
Gr 1-2 ``Earl's got a hat with a real horse feather,/ He wears socks made of chicken leather./ Earl's too cool for me.'' A nerdy lad with small glasses and hair parted in the middle is sure that Earl's just too hip to be a friend, but when the two finally meet they hit it off``Yes, Earl's pretty funny, and he's really nice./ He's eight years old and only thrown up twice.'' The young narrator concludes, ``We're as cool as cool can be.'' In the slightly grotesque watercolor illustrations, a la Henrik Drescher, but with a clearer, less speckled look, adults and children surround Earl in admiring crowds. As in Annie Bananie (Harper, 1987) Komaiko takes a fresh look at a well-worn subject, but compared to Clifton's Everett Anderson's Friend (Holt, 1976; o.p.), the treatment here is awkward and superficial, the ending too quick and easy. John Peters, New York Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060519148
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/13/2003
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
(w) x 7.62(h) x (d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Leah Komaiko is the author of several popular rhyming books for children including Annie Bananie, a Children's Choice Award winner, and I Like the Music, a Reading Rainbow Review Book. She lives in Los Angeles, CA.

Laura Cornell lives in New York City with her daughter, Lily (first and only), but they spend much time in California, Laura's first state in her first home. She was asked to illustrate Jamie's first book, and that became ten. Lucky is the first word that comes to mind.

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