Early Adopter MAC OS X Java

Early Adopter MAC OS X Java

by WILLIAMS, Eric Albert

Paperback(2001)

$0.01

Item is available through our marketplace sellers.


Overview

Early Adopter MAC OS X Java by WILLIAMS, Eric Albert

Mac OS X is a UNIX-based operating system that runs on some of the finest hardware in the world. It comes with some excellent development tools, and a first-class Java 2 Standard Edition implementation, including a HotSpot client virtual machine, tied right into the operating system. Apple has made Java a first-class citizen of Mac OS X, and this book shows how Java developers can take advantage of the power they've been given.

Using Java as a development language on Mac OS X, you can write portable pure Java applications that run and look like native programs, or you can develop programs that exploit the Cocoa programming interface, allowing you to build powerful Mac OS X applications and take advantage of all the functionality provided by Apple's exciting Aqua UI. You can also exploit native operating-system functionality without writing any C or C++ code, through APIs such as JDirect. This book explains to the experienced Java developer where to start, what's possible, and where to go.

This book covers:

  • The role of Java in Mac OS X
  • Using Mac OS X as a Java development platform
  • Writing portable Java Code
  • Taking advantage of Mac OS X's features in pure Java applications
  • Developing enterprise applications on Mac OS X
  • Deploying Java code as a Mac OS X application
  • Accessing OS-specific functions through MRJ and JDirect
  • Using Java to program Cocoa

    Mac OS X is a new operating system for almost everybody. Mac users may feel slightly more at home with some aspects of its interface, but anybody coming from a UNIX background will also find familiar features that Mac users will find totally alien. Therefore, this book doesn't make any assumptions about whether you come from a Mac or non-Mac background. What it does assume, however, is that you're reasonably experienced with Java, or perhaps in the process of learning it.

    Author Biography: Daniel Steinberg is the Director of Java Offerings for Dim Sum Thinking in Cleveland, Ohio. He has covered Java on the Mac for the last five years for JavaWorld magazine, writes a monthly column for the O'Reilly Mac DevCenter, is a regular contributor for IBM's developerWorks and was an author on the recent Wrox title Professional Web Objects.

    Murray Todd Williams works as a freelance computer consultant. He has programmed computers since he was eight years old, from the ancient HP-85 to his new Dual-G4 Power Mac! For the last seven years he has fanatically supported Linux and the entire Open Source movement and has worked on migrating Open Source projects to OS X.

    Eric Albert worked on the Java classes team at Apple for more than two years while still a student at Stanford University. He has also taught introductory programming at Stanford, and is currently a software engineer for a company in Seattle. He can be reached via email at ejalbert@cs.stanford.edu.

    James Hart is a writer and programmer, employed as a Technical Architect on the Early Adopter editorial team at Wrox Press. As well as writing this book, he has also contributed to the Wrox books Professional Java XML and Java XML Programmer's Reference, in both cases writing about IBM's Java-based Web Services platform.

    John Hopkins earned his B.S. in mathematics at Texas Christian University, before starting his programming career at General Dynamics. He moved on to develop desktop applications for the Mac OS first with Data Tailor, then with the SU5 Group, helping with the creation of Trapeze, Persuasion, DeltaGraph, FaxSTF Network and Meeting Maestro. He is currently studying upcoming XML and peer-to-peer computing technologies for virtual supercomputing and cycle selling projects.

  • Product Details

    ISBN-13: 9781861006110
    Publisher: Apress
    Publication date: 11/14/2001
    Edition description: 2001
    Pages: 200
    Product dimensions: 0.00(w) x 0.00(h) x 0.02(d)

    About the Author

    Daniel Steinberg is the Director of Java Offerings for Dim Sum Thinking in Cleveland, Ohio. He has covered Java on the Mac for the last five years for JavaWorld magazine, writes a monthly column for the O'Reilly Mac DevCenter, is a regular contributor for IBM's developerWorks and was an author on the recent Wrox title Professional Web Objects.

    Murray Todd Williams works as a freelance computer consultant. He has programmed computers since he was eight years old, from the ancient HP-85 to his new Dual-G4 Power Mac! For the last seven years he has fanatically supported Linux and the entire Open Source movement and has worked on migrating Open Source projects to OS X.

    Eric Albert worked on the Java classes team at Apple for more than two years while still a student at Stanford University. He has also taught introductory programming at Stanford, and is currently a software engineer for a company in Seattle. He can be reached via email at ejalbert@cs.stanford.edu.

    James Hart is a writer and programmer, employed as a Technical Architect on the Early Adopter editorial team at Wrox Press. As well as writing this book, he has also contributed to the Wrox books Professional Java XML and Java XML Programmer's Reference, in both cases writing about IBM's Java-based Web Services platform.

    John Hopkins earned his B.S. in mathematics at Texas Christian University, before starting his programming career at General Dynamics. He moved on to develop desktop applications for the Mac OS first with Data Tailor, then with the SU5 Group, helping with the creation of Trapeze, Persuasion, DeltaGraph, FaxSTF Network and Meeting Maestro. He is currently studying upcoming XML and peer-to-peer computing technologies for virtual supercomputing and cycle selling projects.

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1: The Mac OS X Java Development PlatformChapter 2: Pure Java Chapter 3: Enterprise Java and OS X Chapter 4: Deployment and Integration Chapter 5: Enhanced Integration Chapter 6: Cocoa and Java Chapter 7: Finding the Path

    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    See All Customer Reviews