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Early Occult Memory Systems of the Lower Midwest
     

Early Occult Memory Systems of the Lower Midwest

5.0 2
by B. H. Fairchild
 

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Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.
B. H. Fairchild's memory systems are the collective vision of America's despairing dreamers—failed baseball players, oil field laborers, a surrealist priest, college boys at a burlesque theater, the last remaining cast members of The Wizard of Oz. Looming over all is the fact and the mystery of our continued

Overview

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.
B. H. Fairchild's memory systems are the collective vision of America's despairing dreamers—failed baseball players, oil field laborers, a surrealist priest, college boys at a burlesque theater, the last remaining cast members of The Wizard of Oz. Looming over all is the fact and the mystery of our continued renewal.

Editorial Reviews

Chicago Tribune
“These poems are an ecstatic celebration of language—long, lavish lines sprawling across the page as the speaker's consciousness roams the Kansas countryside. Fairchild is a spinner of tales who writes unforgettably of loneliness and the tenderness of the Midwest.”
Anthony Hecht
“There is no more lyric celebration of America's grandeurs and desolations than in this superb collection of poems.”
Eavan Bloand
“These poems make a rare, magical conjunction between a communal sense of place and a solitary habit of memory.”
Richard Howard
“What an exaltation!”
Gerald Stern
“Fairchild is in touch with that America we almost forgot, melancholy, dream-ridden, wistful, ghost-like.”
Eavan Boland
“These poems make a rare, magical conjunction between a communal sense of place and a solitary habit of memory.”
Publishers Weekly
A much-lauded late-bloomer, B.H. Fairchild imbues his amiable formal verse with Hollywood-caliber style, sentiment and (mainly) good cheer in Early Occult Memory Systems of the Lower Midwest. Following the runaway success of his 1997 Alice James book, The Art of the Lathe, this third collection probes deeper into the bleak beauty of the Midwest in the 1950s, and fans of Fairchild's comforting excursions to the familiar isolated territory of machinists won't be disappointed. If the poet's younger self found "Dvorak's New World... made me/ swallow hard and turn my face away because, well,/ it was beautiful, a word I wasn't easy with," these memory systems yield a sharp-eyed and excited collection of curiosities that work in and beyond the heartland. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393325669
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
05/19/2004
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
125
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

B. H. Fairchild, the author of several acclaimed poetry collections and a recipient of Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, has been a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the William Carlos Williams Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Bobbitt National Prize. He teaches in the creative writing PhD program at the University of North Texas.

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Early Occult Memory Systems of the Lower Midwest 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I grew-up in Nebraska in the 1960s, not far from Fairchild's Kansas in the 50s. Unlike any other book of poetry, this one 'speaks' to me. Visualizing the landscapes of these poems is effortless and, for me, the interplay of human intention and life's inevitable digressions found in the poems is humorous and thought provoking. I highly recommend this book to those who, like myself and perhaps the author, find themselves geographically away from their rural midwestern beginings, but holding them closer to their hearts with the passing of time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was recently at a Fairchild reading in Liberal, Kansas. Being 29, young, and accustomed to the frantic pace of today, I wasn't sure if this was something I would honestly enjoy. I will say my evening was not wasted. I was so pleasantly amused with his witty words. Also, I was moved to think of times gone by in my hometown. I easily sat there in the audience--quietly listening--thinking of how amazing it is that there is such power in words. My review won't begin to compare with the critics for I have no frilly words to bestow upon you. If you are wanting something that will make you think--something that will take you to not-so-faraway places--try Fairchild's book. Simply put: it's great.