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Eclipse Modeling Project: A Domain-Specific Language (DSL) Toolkit
     

Eclipse Modeling Project: A Domain-Specific Language (DSL) Toolkit

4.7 3
by Richard C. Gronback
 

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Achieve Breakthrough Productivity and Quality with MDD and Eclipse-Based DSLs

 

Domain-specific languages (DSLs) and model-driven development (MDD) offer software engineers powerful new ways to improve productivity, enhance quality, and insulate systems from rapid technological change. Now, there’s a pragmatic, start-to-finish

Overview

Achieve Breakthrough Productivity and Quality with MDD and Eclipse-Based DSLs

 

Domain-specific languages (DSLs) and model-driven development (MDD) offer software engineers powerful new ways to improve productivity, enhance quality, and insulate systems from rapid technological change. Now, there’s a pragmatic, start-to-finish guide to creating DSLs and using MDD techniques with the powerful open source Eclipse platform. In Eclipse Modeling Project, Richard C. Gronback illuminates both the principles and techniques software professionals need to master, offering insights that will be invaluable to developers working with any tool or platform.

 

As coleader of the Eclipse Modeling Project, Gronback is singularly well-positioned to demonstrate DSLs and MDD at work in Eclipse. Gronback systematically introduces each of the Eclipse technologies that can be used in DSL and MDD development. Throughout, he introduces key concepts and technologies in the context of a complete worked example and presents new best practices and never-before published techniques. He also covers Eclipse projects discussed in no other book, including Query/View/Transformation (QVT) and the Graphical Modeling Framework (GMF)—a project the author personally leads.

 

Eclipse Modeling Project gives software practitioners all the knowledge they need to explore the remarkable potential of DSLs and MDD—and includes coverage of

 

  • Why a model-based approach enables the rapid customization of high-quality solutions within the product line paradigm
  • How the Eclipse Modeling Project’s capabilities can be used to efficiently create new DSLs
  • Powerful techniques for developing DSL abstract syntax, graphical notation, and textual syntax
  • How to build Model-to-Model (M2M) and Model-to-Text (M2T) transformations—including a powerful new M2M implementation of the Object Management Group’s QVT Operational Mapping Language (OML)
  • Efficiently packaging and deploying DSLs with Eclipse
  • Complete reference sections for the Graphical Editing Framework (GEF), GMF runtime and tooling, QVT OML, Xpand, and more

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321635198
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
03/06/2009
Series:
Eclipse Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
736
File size:
25 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Richard Gronback is the chief scientist for modeling products at Borland Software Corporation, where he manages both open source and commercial product development. Richard represents Borland on the Eclipse Board of Directors and Planning and Architecture Councils, co-leads the Modeling project Project Management Committee (PMC), and leads the GMF and Amalgam projects. Richard holds a Bachelor of Software Engineering degree in computer science and engineering from the University of Connecticut. He was a reactor operator in the U.S. Navy before entering his current career in software.

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Eclipse Modeling Project: A Domain-Specific Language (DSL) Toolkit 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
We keep squil in here. Im still sky
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boudville More than 1 year ago
If you use Eclipse, you probably know it as a neat Integrated Development Environment for java, where perhaps you manually write all the java code. This book shows a different take on Eclipse; a much higher level of sophistication. Basically, it shows how to go from a diagram of a set of related classes to autogenerated java code. Developers have put a massive amount of effort into fleshing out this ability; something well documented by the book. The starting diagram is a domain model. It models a scenario that you are interested in. You might think that an alternative approach is to use Backus Naur Formalism to define the same information. But the book deprecates BNF. Decades-long experience with BNF suggests that it lacks expressive power, and that perhaps the pure text nature of a BNF instantiation is too hard to grasp relationships between objects. Instead, the expression of a domain model in terms of what is roughly [or exactly] a UML diagram gives visuals that people can far more easily absorb. What the book has is a set of very detailed tutorials. Each walks through a given example model. Fleshing out how to use Eclipse to make the model. Initially, the book's narrative is at a very abstract level, which may hard for some to follow. But the tutorials help give this substance. Each tutorial is non-trivial, and shows how Eclipse has extensive abilities to help you. In terms of autogeneration, it's not just java code. The book gives examples of autogenerated XML, and in general we see the use of Model to Text transformation templates that spit out text files. One common feature of all of these is the sheer verbosity of the the textual output. Autogeneration saves you labour and reduces the occurrence of simple bugs. Thus Eclipse lets you work as much as possible at a diagrammatic level, which can be more productive.