The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1)

The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1)

by Kevin J. Anderson

Paperback(Original)

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Overview

Terra Incognita - the blank spaces on the map, past the edge of the world, marked only by the words "here be monsters."



Two nations at war, fighting for dominion over the known, and undiscovered, world, pin their last hopes at ultimate victory on finding a land out of legend.



Each will send their ships to brave the untamed seas, wild storms, sea serpents, and darker dangers unknown to any man. It is a perilous undertaking, but there will always be the impetuous, the brave and the mad who are willing to leave their homes to explore the unknown.



Even unto the edge of the world...



Kevin J. Anderson's spectacular fantasy debut is a sweeping tale of adventure on the high seas, as two warring kingdoms vie for the greatest treasure of them all.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316004183
Publisher: Orbit
Publication date: 06/08/2009
Series: Terra Incognita Series , #1
Edition description: Original
Pages: 608
Sales rank: 1,221,897
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.70(d)

About the Author

Kevin J. Anderson has written 46 national bestsellers and has over 20 million books in print worldwide in 30 languages. He has been nominated for the Nebula Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFX Readers' Choice Award. Find out more about Kevin Anderson at www.wordfire.com.

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The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Jvstin More than 1 year ago
Kevin J Anderson is well known in SF circles for his "Saga of Seven Suns" SF series, and more visibly, for his extensions of the Dune universe written by Frank Herbert's son Brian. Here, in The Edge of the World, Kevin J Anderson tries something new--a fantasy novel. As it so happens this is the first novel of Anderson's I have read, and so I came into reading this novel unaware of first-hand knowledge of his writing styles and choices. The Edge of the World is billed as the first of the "Terra Incognita" series, and is set in a very low magic (lower than even, say, George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones world) universe. The level of technology, aside from gunpowder, is pre-Renaissance, early Age of Exploration. And therein hangs the hook for his story. Two squabbling nations divided by different interpretations of a common origin myth find themselves, by bad luck and coincidence, drawn into a protracted religious-political conflict. In the meantime, both nations strive to explore the world beyond the continent that houses both Tierra and Uraba. There is a third, smaller, religious group that lives in both lands and tries to get along in the midst of the war. Although I am sure Anderson did not intend it, I got a Guy Gavriel Kay vibe from the parallels between his three factions and the Kindath, Asharites, and Jaddites. The book is divided into short chapters--over 110 in a 570 page volume. Plenty of POV characters in all three groups. Readers used to large casts and whiplash changes between POV characters will be familiar with the technique. Having weaned myself on Martin and Erikson, I didn't have a problem with the structure of the book. Too, many of the plot contrivances and coincidences seemed fine, if suitably tragic to continue to simmer and increase the conflict between the two nations. Characters show up and often die quickly, again, much like Martin and Erikson. However, I felt a couple of the twists and turns in the tale seemed like needless cruelty and not important to the overall plot. I didn't see their point and it was somewhat offputting. Also, while Anderson mostly does a good job to show that both sides in the religious-political conflict are capable of atrocity and evil, the finger does seem a bit on the scales to one side, at least to my perception. With those concerns aside, however, the Age of Exploration is an interesting time period in Earth's history, and Anderson captures it well in his fantasy universe. He's an accomplished writer, that comes across very well. And aside from some of the plot concerns, I was more than well satisfied with character development, growth and change. Anderson paints on a pretty big blank map (a metaphor used in the book) and I do want to see how the map fills in, especially given the discoveries made by characters from both nations in the novel. I am intrigued enough by the novel's strengths to want to continue to read the series, and perhaps eventually try his Saga of Seven Suns novels, too.
Gnomicron More than 1 year ago
I recently finished The Edge of the World by Kevin J. Anderson. Being a long time fan of this author, I do look forward to every one of his projects. I liked the Saga of Seven Suns series for its multitude of characters and the space opera setting. His DC Comics novels appeal to me because I am a long-time DC fan. The Dune books are good, because, while adding to the fabric of the Dune Universe, you also get a different type of storytelling than that of Frank Herbert. Edge of the World was a little different. When I first heard about this project, I was a little apprehensive. Religious wars between two nations? Not really my cup of tea. I was drawn into it mostly by the sense of adventure and wonder to see what's beyond the next sunrise. In this book, there are no definite "good guys" and "bad guys." As in life, there are extremists on both sides of the issue. It's for the reader to decide who is hero and who is villain. My favorite parts of this book did take place in and around the exploratory ship, the Luminara. I could have read a full book on just it's story alone. And that was only one of the journeys in the book. I liked the other one as well. I wish both could have lasted longer. I've also been enjoying the companion CD project by Roswell Six, Terra Incognita: Beyond the Horizon. I like the mix of ballads, duets and rock numbers based on a couple of storylines from the book. An incredible mix of talent went into this work. From lyrics by Anderson and his wife, to music by Eric Norlander and others. I'm hoping there will be another CD for at least the third novel in this trilogy. In closing, I'm looking forward to book number 2, The Map of All Things.
TexasJune More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of Kevin Anderson and his Saga of the Seven Suns series and his co-authoring the Dune series. I WAS a little skeptical, of this book. I like to read space adventures. BUT... I had to try it, Kevin is one of my favorite authors after all. And I was not disappointed. The Edge of the World is a GREAT book. Lots of adventures, discoveries, romance (good and evil), little mistakes that turn into major war. This is a hard to put down book. I highly recommend it.
harstan More than 1 year ago
The war between the followers of the two Gods, Aiden and Urec, the sons of the creator, has been going on forever. Both nations have suffered from the constant battles and need for vigil. An inferno devastates the city of Ishalem that sits on the isthmus separating the two kingdoms. Each side blames the other for the disaster and back and forth reprisals heats up the hostilities over the next thirteen years. -------- Hope to end the conflict seems unlikely as massacres especially of civilians are the acceptable norm. Yet each nation decides victory is theirs if they are the first to find a legendary land on THE EDGE OF THE WORLD that hints of divine truths, which also means a dangerous sea race venturing into the treacherous sea beyond the isthmus.---------- The first Terra Incognita tale showcases Kevin J. Anderson's skills as he leaves outer space (see the Saga of Seven Suns) for an apparent fantasy saga. However, although there are hints of otherworldly elements, none surface so that the hostilities make the story line seem more like a historical military novel. Still the tale is engaging as Mr. Anderson begins to explore the causes of the conflict; hopefully in future entries he will go core deep into how the constant war impacts societies; as the fight rules these two nations.---------- Harriet Klausner
Jvstin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Kevin J Anderson is well known in SF circles for his "Saga of Seven Suns" SF series, and more visibly, for his extensions of the Dune universe written by Frank Herbert's son Brian.Here, in The Edge of the World, Kevin J Anderson tries something new--a fantasy novel. As it so happens this is the first novel of Anderson's I have read, and so I came into reading this novel unaware of first-hand knowledge of his writing styles and choices.The Edge of the World is billed as the first of the "Terra Incognita" series, and is set in a very low magic (lower than even, say, George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones world) universe. The level of technology, aside from gunpowder, is pre-Renaissance, early Age of Exploration. And therein hangs the hook for his story. Two squabbling nations divided by different interpretations of a common origin myth find themselves, by bad luck and coincidence, drawn into a protracted religious-political conflict. In the meantime, both nations strive to explore the world beyond the continent that houses both Tierra and Uraba. There is a third, smaller, religious group that lives in both lands and tries to get along in the midst of the war. Although I am sure Anderson did not intend it, I got a Guy Gavriel Kay vibe from the parallels between his three factions and the Kindath, Asharites, and Jaddites.The book is divided into short chapters--over 110 in a 570 page volume. Plenty of POV characters in all three groups. Readers used to large casts and whiplash changes between POV characters will be familiar with the technique. Having weaned myself on Martin and Erikson, I didn't have a problem with the structure of the book. Too, many of the plot contrivances and coincidences seemed fine, if suitably tragic to continue to simmer and increase the conflict between the two nations. Characters show up and often die quickly, again, much like Martin and Erikson. However, I felt a couple of the twists and turns in the tale seemed like needless cruelty and not important to the overall plot. I didn't see their point and it was somewhat offputting. Also, while Anderson mostly does a good job to show that both sides in the religious-political conflict are capable of atrocity and evil, the finger does seem a bit on the scales to one side, at least to my perception.With those concerns aside, however, the Age of Exploration is an interesting time period in Earth's history, and Anderson captures it well in his fantasy universe. He's an accomplished writer, that comes across very well.And aside from some of the plot concerns, I was more than well satisfied with character development, growth and change. Anderson paints on a pretty big blank map (a metaphor used in the book) and I do want to see how the map fills in, especially given the discoveries made by characters from both nations in the novel.I am intrigued enough by the novel's strengths to want to continue to read the series, and perhaps eventually try his Saga of Seven Suns novels, too.
FandomaniaKelly on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The premise here has a lot of promise, exploring vast uncharted territory, religious wars, and sea monsters, and on those counts it certainly delivers. If you¿re looking for a broad-scoped action and adventure novel this summer (or anytime, really) this is a fun read, but great literature it is not. Before I delve into that, however, I do want to point out where this book succeeded for me.Events of the book, including religious wars and a shared holy city with conflicting views about who should get the credit not only reference the Crusades, but the idea of a holy war really extends even to modern events. The story isn¿t told from one side or the other. We don¿t hear just from the Tierrans and about how they are morally superior; we see the events unfold from the Urabans¿ perspective as well. It illustrates how easily misunderstandings can escalate into terrible consequences and how neither side is entirely in the right or in the wrong.The scope of the story isn¿t something that many authors would feel comfortable with. Rather than focusing on one or two characters through the one battle to save them all, you have a large ensemble of characters and an entire world to look at. This can have its drawbacks, which I¿ll get into, but it was ambitious and I can certainly appreciate that. Also, who could say no to sea monsters?What I would have liked to see more of is character development. I don¿t care as much about world building beyond the basics needed for the story, and I don¿t need pages and pages of description of the terrain or how someone looks when the sun hits them from the west and they¿re turning counter clockwise. However, if the story is going to be told from different points of view, as this one is told from a different point of view every short chapter, I want to really get inside their heads. As a personal preference I would have preferred to spend more time with fewer characters. As it was, all of the characters seemed a little distant from me, so I couldn¿t really care much about any one of them. I can appreciate wanting to show an impartial view of events, but I think that works better for the History Channel than it does for a fantasy novel.Overall, griping aside, I was entertained. If you like action, exploration, and high seas adventure this will be a fun and quick read. I wanted more, and I can only hope that the next two books can deliver. I have to give this one a C, but I have high hopes for what will come next.
StephanieTiner More than 1 year ago
At the edge of the known world, there are monsters, sea serpents, strange magic, and the dreaded Leviathan. With the nations of Tierra and Uraba engaged in a holy war, both nations seek to discover the lands of holy Joron, the lands of their ancestors. Both nations will launch expeditions over land and sea into uncharted territories in search of anything that will help with their quests and their war. With a diverse and imaginative cast of characters, The Edge of the World is a dynamic adventure story that will inspire you to launch your own adventures. This is a very interesting story that follows the journeys of many characters for over more than a decade. I enjoyed the adventurous explorations in this novel very much. The author made it extremely entertaining, as well as, very detailed. Reading about the construction of the ships as well as their travels, encounters, and discoveries, was a unique turn of events for me, and highly enjoyable. The back of the book lead me to believe that this book was mostly a great adventure story, but a large portion of this novel was the war and the politics behind the war. I was automatically drawn toward one of the two nations. Their religious beliefs, is what dominates the primary cause for the war, having only a slight impact on my choice. Mainly the brutal tactics and the destructive inner political moves of the one nation, infuriated me. Truthfully, in the beginning, most of what occurred aggravated me because I felt like everyone involved were acting without logic or intelligence. However, I do realize that this was a pivotal point for the rest of the book and could easily have happened in real life. I am currently unsure of my exact feelings toward this book. I have not decided if I liked it or not, which does not happen to me often. If I manage to locate a copy of book two, I do intend to give it a try. I would recommend this novel to fans of adventure and political conflict. I bought my copy of this novel from my local library and have permission from the publishers to use the cover artwork image above. More Reviews at stephanietiner.weebly.com
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Loved it
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guyTX More than 1 year ago
I had never heard of Kevin J. Anderson before reading "The Edge of the World". While reading the book, I saw Anderson's name associated with Star Wars (which my family read/watched but I don't) and Dune (I read 4 or 5 books). I was immediately pulled into this book (The Edge...) and couldn't put it down. I read loads of fantasy and books meant for high school kids. True, there are some rather descriptive killing scenes in the book not worthy of reading or discussion within a school environment. Nonetheless, his imagination in creating those three different groups of people and their daily movement through time whether on land or water, well it does make one wonder how they were created. As a creative and imaginative person myself, I am pleased to read descriptions well beyond those I have made up. As soon as I see the followup book(s) extending this story, I am sure to purchase them.
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