Edited to Death: A Maggie Fiori Mystery

Edited to Death: A Maggie Fiori Mystery

by Linda Lee Peterson
3.6 23

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Overview

Edited to Death: A Maggie Fiori Mystery by Linda Lee Peterson

The Knockout Debut of the Maggie Fiori Mystery Series
If Maggie Fiori doesn’t have it all, she’s got plenty: a job at a chic San Francisco magazine, a handsome attorney husband, two beautiful sons, and a comfortable life in Oakland. But her smart mouth and everyday life as a magazine editor and loving wife and mother camouflage a dark secret. The camouflage comes off after she finds her editor dead in his gorgeous Pacific Heights Victorian, and Maggie realizes she has to come to terms with the complicated relationship she had with her boss. She can’t rest until she solves the murder—and saves her marriage—and her quest ends up putting her in grave danger.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781938849329
Publisher: Prospect Park Books
Publication date: 09/25/2013
Series: A Maggie Fiori Mystery , #1
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 219
Sales rank: 293,292
File size: 470 KB

About the Author

Linda Lee Peterson is the author of two Maggie Fiori mysteries, Edited to Death and The Devil's Interval. Peterson has also written several nonfiction books, including The Stanford Century, On Flowers(Chronicle), and Linens and Candles (HarperCollins) and is a contributor to national publications, including the Chicago Tribune. A longtime San Franciscan and an alumna of Stanford University, Peterson now lives in Portland, Oregon.

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Edited to Death 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ms. Peterson gets rolling with the first line and never lets up. There's humor on every page, but you can also hear and feel the crackling current of tension that runs between her amateur sleuth, Maggie Fiore, and Maggie's husband, Michael. There's also the friction and pull Maggie feels between her commitment to the people she loves and her aspirations for herself as an individual -- you don't have to be a female, wife, or mother to feel and relate to that conflict. Oh, no! For those who care only about the whodunit puzzle, the double mystery will keep you turning the pages. In order to figure out who killed the dead guy you have to figure out what the dead guy was after with a mysterious magazine article he was all set to assign to his favorite freelance writer: Maggie Fiore. Maggie had gone to his apartment to get the scoop on the project only to find him dead. And so the adventure begins.
IYamVixenBooks More than 1 year ago
Yes, this is an amateur sleuth, but it's not your everyday type of mellow cozy amateur sleuth. There's some grit here, actually quite a lot of grit. I like my amateur sleuths single as a rule. No families to get in the way of the nosiness of the main character. I tend to wonder how the family of the nosy-Nellie put up with the main character not being there for her/his (mostly her) family. What did the main character do with the kids? Here...we know. It's spelled out and in big ol' letters. It enhances the story as much as the suspense. I had a hard time empathizing with Maggie. She has a good life, but wants more. I know that's the case sometimes, but she really whinged about it...bugged the pewp out of me. Then the mystery took over as did Maggie's abilities. She's intelligent and funny, a bit snarky, and knows her way around San Francisco. I look forward to more from Maggie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The richness of references to music, art, literature and medicine woven into this engaging tale of a smart modern San Francisco woman juggling being a mom, wife, writer and sleuth make this a fun read. The characters come alive in the hands of talented writer, Linda Lee Peterson and make you want to explore more adventures of main character, Maggie Fiori.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're interested in a clever plot, snappy dialogue, a setting to die for and fine writing, read Edited to Death. Linda Peterson's sleuth, Maggie Fiori, a magazine writer/wife/mother will appeal to any mystery reader, regardless of your preferred genre. You'll want to turn the pages to find out what happens to Fiori, but you'll linger long enough to savor the vivid descriptions of the San Francisco Bay Area, and pick up the clues cleverly placed throughout the locale.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this novel engaging and entertaining because of the characters that populate it. There aren't many mysteries that have a marriage within them that are central to the plot as well as a source of suspense. Maggie and Michael are definitely not Nick and Nora; indeed, calling Maggie an 'amateur sleuth' is probably an overstatement. The murder victim's relationships with the other colorful people in the book make his presence as animated as theirs. San Francisco itself is a major character and Peterson renders the city with the same skill as her other subjects. I enjoyed this book a great deal.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love a good mystery, and this one¿s got it all: a plot with punch and pull; rich, vivid descriptions; and cast of breathing, realized characters who swirl around the singular lead¿an oddball charmer with edges and secrets and a lot of heart. But Maggie Fiori is not the slightly embittered loner tough-chick who often stars in mystery fiction. She¿s savvy, witty, passionate, and enmeshed in a world of relationships¿husband, children, co-workers and collaborators, friends old and new. Maggie isn¿t just solving a mystery in Edited to Death, she¿s righting wrongs, making amends, enlarging possibilities, and trying to make sense of the ripple effects that occur across all relationships when one connection changes or ends. She¿s also a big smarty who knows a little bit about a lot of things. I not only learned more about the San Francisco Bay Area, I picked up a little art history, some poetry, and a sprinkling of Italian and Yiddish. I look forward to Maggie¿s continuing adventures.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I only finished this book because I bought it. It was so goody.goody and boring!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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NeatoNetto More than 1 year ago
I was delighted since this was my first Linda Lee Peterson read. Really a time enjoyably spent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PSA More than 1 year ago
Peterson's leading character Maggie Fiori is nimble tongued, able to process that onto paper without losing any of the wit and spontaneity, and approaches her amateur detecting in the same manner. Shakespeare quotes and all, an enjoyable read for those who admire a fast paced intrigue.
Tina70CH More than 1 year ago
Great mystery and mostly believable characters that became more real as the plot was revealed. Not sure why there were so many obscure words. I have never looked up so many words while reading. Love that I can! Looking forward to more Maggie Fiori mysteries.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story line
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This free book has 260 pages. It was well edited. The author uses a lot of really long, obscure words. I knew what they all meant, yet it made the book seem very snobbish and elitest. This novel was written in the first person. There were bi-sexuals, homosexuals, tri-sexuals and heterosexuals all playing musical beds with each other, even the married ones and religious leaders. The characters were worried about HIV, AIDS and other stds, some had one or several of these afflictions. There is murder and violence, but not very detailed. Lots of curse words, sex (mild), vomiting, drug use and abuse, selling and smuggling. Some religion of which part is irreverant. The characters seem arrogant and intitled. It reminded me of a British or English mystery, but was set in San Franscico. The were a few spots of a very dry type of humor. I felt really sorry for Michael, he seemed like a very nice guy, but came across as too nice. He needed a backbone. His wife needed a big dose of reality and a kick in the pants. I found this book stilted and boring. Part of that was the expanded vocabulary and first person format, part the unlikeable characters, the sleeping around and alternative sexual activity. The mystery was boring and too spread out. This book semed to be stuck in a mud hole and unable to move forward, move forward a few feet and become restuck. There was more talking then doing. For ages 18 and up. AD
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is used in front of quesion in spanish or is the usual font typos found more and more
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
O.K.I wonder about this everytime I come across it and I just did again on the review for The Daily Find on Edited to Death from a reader-A Ripping Great Read-March7,2005.I'm sorry for using the review space but how else would I find out?It's silly but it bugs me to death.What's up with the upside down question mark?Is it a mistake or a trend and how is it done?I can't believe that I'm the only one who has wondered.Or am I???????? Granny B.