Effective C++: 55 Specific Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs / Edition 3

Effective C++: 55 Specific Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs / Edition 3

by Scott Meyers
4.3 8
ISBN-10:
0321334876
ISBN-13:
9780321334879
Pub. Date:
05/26/2005
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
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Effective C++: 55 Specific Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Dr_Germ More than 1 year ago
This is an outstanding book. Well written, enjoyable, and supremely useful. I read this within a two week period, and virtually after every Item in the book (in fact, usually several times within each Item) did I go back to my production C++ code to fix things, improve things, or simply re-familiarize myself with concepts I had previously come across but couldn't quite comprehend. If you are all but the most skilled C++ programmer, this book will without a doubt teach you a number of valuable lessons. I also found that it got me to think about issues that I had never encountered before, but that led to deeper understanding of C++ in particular and software design in general. Highly, *highly* recommended.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book for anyone who is writing C code and compiling it with a C++ compiler. Scott Meyers helps you understand why to implement each recommendation in a way so that you don't need to simply trust his advice without understandnig why. This book will help you understand how to make incremental improvements in how you build C++ applications.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This seems to be for a C++ programmer who has moved beyond mastery of the basic syntax. Ok, you can implement a set of interrelated classes and get everything compiled and run. But, and you're aware of this, there may be refinements in coding that elude you. So Meyers offers a cookbook of 55 improvements. I'd agree with the cover's claim that these recipes are indeed specific enough to be useful. Take the suggestion about deferring variable definitions as long as possible. This minimises the chance of creating unused variables, which has an attendant cost in computing and memory, if the compiler is not smart enough to omit them. Plus, there is a cost in harder coding and debugging, if the definition of a variable is many screens before its first usage. Such a contrast with earlier languages like C or Fortran, where you have to define all the variables upon entry to a subroutine. This example also shows an unheralded merit of the book. A bunch of recipes are also germane in other OO languages like Java. The only gripe I have is with the suggestion of declaring data variables private. I certainly agree with it. But this is one of the first things you learn in any introductory text on an OO language. It really seems unnecssary here, unless the author is just padding out the book.