Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and a New Literacy

Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and a New Literacy

by Kathleen E. Welch, Edward Barrett

Paperback

$19.00

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262519472
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 07/16/1999
Series: Digital Communication Series
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author


Edward Barrett is Senior Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies at MIT.


Kathleen Welch is Presidential Professor in the Department of English at the University of Oklahoma.

Table of Contents

Series Foreword xi(2)
Foreword xiii(2)
Acknowledgments xv
I Classical Greek Literacy and the Spoken Word 1(98)
1 Introduction: Screen Literacy in Rhetoric and Composition Studies
3(26)
2 An Isocratic Literacy Theory: An Alternative Rhetoric of Oral/Aural Articulation
29(46)
3 Disciplining Isocrates
75(24)
II Logos Performers, Screen Sophism, and the Rhetorical Turn 99(112)
4 Next Rhetoric
101(36)
5 Technologies of Electric Rhetoric
137(54)
6 Screen Rhetoric: Sophistic Logos Performers and Electric Rhetoric
191(20)
Appendix: Excerpt from the Origin Myth of Acoma and Other Records, recorded by Matthew W. Stirling 211(12)
References 223(24)
Index 247

What People are Saying About This

Endorsement

Kathleen Welch's elegant, incisive, and quirky intelligence is everywhere apparent in Electric Rhetoric. In it, she re-theorizes (and re-races, re-genders, and re-performs) Pre-Aristotelian rhetoric and then uses it to explore posthumanist literacy and rhetoric in a range of electronic spaces. In its insistent rejection of what Welch calls the 'worst' of Enlightenment, Modernist, and Postmodernist values—and in its bold program for change—this book is going to make a lot of people nervous. A must read!

Andrea A. Lunsford, Distinguished Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Study of Writing, Ohio State University

Andrea A. Lunsford

Kathleen Welch's elegant, incisive, and quirky intelligence is everywhere apparent in Electric Rhetoric. In it, she re-theorizes (and re-races, re-genders, and re-performs) Pre-Aristotelian rhetoric and then uses it to explore posthumanist literacy and rhetoric in a range of electronic spaces. In its insistent rejection of what Welch calls the 'worst' of Enlightenment, Modernist, and Postmodernist values—and in its bold program for change—this book is going to make a lot of people nervous. A must read!

Foreword

Welch's work gives us some of the in-depth understanding we need to be aware of where we really are.

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