The Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars

The Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars

Hardcover

$14.95 View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Wednesday, October 24?   Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Shipping at checkout.

Overview

The Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars by Jean Merrill, Ronni Solbert

What is your favorite thing to do in the whole world? Whatever it is, odds are that you don’t like doing it as much as the elephant in this book enjoys smashing small cars. He’ll smash any small car that drives down his road. He smashes yellow cars, he smashes blue cars, he smashes red cars, all the while singing a special car-smashing song. Then one day a man comes to town and opens a small-car store right on the elephant’s road. You can probably guess what the elephant does next, but the real fun starts when the man turns the tables on the elephant—and his plan is a smashing success. 

Jean Merrill’s story of gleeful destruction, revenge, and conciliation is accompanied by Ronni Solbert’s colorful crayon drawings. Rarely has property damage looked so adorable.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781590178720
Publisher: New York Review Books
Publication date: 03/10/2015
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 1,241,130
Product dimensions: 9.77(w) x 8.16(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range: 3 - 7 Years

About the Author

Jean Merrill (1923–2012) was born in Rochester, New York, and grew up on a dairy and apple farm near Lake Ontario. She received a master’s degree in English literature from Wellesley in 1945 and later studied folklore in India on a Fulbright fellowship. She worked for many years as an editor at Scholastic Magazine, Literary Cavalcade, and the publications department of Bank Street College before turning to writing full time. Her first book, Henry, the Hand-Painted Mouse, was published in 1951 and her last, The Girl Who Loved Caterpillars: A Twelfth-Century Tale from Japan, in 1992. In between she wrote some thirty books for young readers, including The Pushcart War (1964; available from The New York Review Children’s  Collection), The Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars (1967), and The Toothpaste Millionaire (1977). 

Ronni Solbert (b. 1925) was born in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Vassar and the Cranbrook Academy of Art. As a Fulbright recipient she studied folk and tribal art in India. She has illustrated more than forty children’s books and written and illustrated three of her own. As a painter, sculptor, and photographer she has exhibited widely in the United States and abroad. 

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Storywraps More than 1 year ago
There's nothing so fine as an elephant who loves to take out small cars.  Take them out you may ask?  Take them out on a date?  Oh my no...take them out by smashing them flat.  Doesn't matter the colour or the make of the car...as long as it's small it is fair fodder for his game. He is intolerant of these little metal beasties that drive down his road and he will have none of it.  Then one day a man comes to town and guess what his occupation is?  He is a small-car salesman and he opens up a huge lot of various small cars right on the elephant's road.   Well what is a crushing-crazed elephant supposed to do but go on a breaking binge and pop those puppies flat real good!  Undaunted by the elephant's rampage the wise man thinks up a way to stop that infringing elephant once and for all and his plan works smashingly.  The illustrations are simple, colourful, crayon drawings done in primary colours.  The elephant does learn his lesson and sees the errors of his ways by a little coaxing, (and probably a little pain) administered by the prudent man who just wants to sell cars...make car deals, not deal with an obsessive, mischievous elephant who loves to sing his special car-smashing song while doing his dastardly deeds of mayhem.  It's a fun, whimsical book not to be taken seriously and I loved it's vibe from the beginning to the end.