Elliott and Gonzales Family Papers. Personal Correspondence, 1861-1865
Elliott and Gonzales Family Papers. Personal Correspondence, 1861-1865

Elliott and Gonzales Family Papers. Personal Correspondence, 1861-1865

by Elliott and Gonzales Family

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Elliott and Gonzales Family Papers. Personal Correspondence, 1861-1865 by Elliott and Gonzales Family

Dear Ralph
I perceive by the papers that Gov Pickens has asked for information as to the quantity of cotton burnt by the planters, and as no notice has been taken by my losses, I set them down that you may give the information when required--my two plantations on Port Royal island--I had [unclear] in 97 thousand pounds of seaside cotton in the seed. It was all burnt. I had one hundred ten head of cattle--1000 bushels corn-several hundred of peas--[fodder]& cc--all were allowed to fall into the Enemy's hand. Finding my negroes insubordinate refusing to work and communicating with the Enemy, I applied to Genl Ripley--then in command--for a military force to [save property] and restrain the negroes. I offered to command or accompany the expedition. Genl Ripley declined, saying he had no authority. On the arrival of Genl Lee I renewed my application, and his answer was that he had no adequate force to hold the island--but that he would send an expedition which might serve to burn the cotton, drive off the cattle.
Half of Genl Lee's plan failed as you know, from the refusal of the Cavalry corps to volunteer. The [unclear] with his mounted artillery successfully executed his mission, and fourteen cotton houses were burnt. I was by far the largest loser, but no one has thus far seen fit to take any notice of the fact, nor given me [unclear] for destroying rather than refusing the cotton to fall into the Enemy's hands. Had adequate force been given me at an early period I should have secured my corn cattle and many of my negroes who are now sheltered by the Enemy. And my cotton might have been save at least in part had I been able to secure boats& wagons for that end--through the control of my negroes, which the presence of an armed force would have affected.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940016387468
Publisher: New York, The Sterling Press
Publication date: 03/18/2013
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 81 KB

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