Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam

by Fredrik Logevall
4.1 9

Paperback(Reprint)

$15.15 $22.00 Save 31% Current price is $15.15, Original price is $22. You Save 31%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, November 22 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have thoroughly enjoyed this book. Its very informative.
HAYACK More than 1 year ago
Where to start? As someone thrown into the draft lottery in the late 1960s I had great expectations for this tome. Logevall's extraordinary research of, I suspect, arcane diaries, (e.g.) General Giap and Ho Chi Minh, and chronicling of a little known period of history is worthy of its Pulitzer prize. Unfortunately, and the reason for my two star ranking, Logevall allows his Ultra-leftist bias to unnecessarily taint his scholarship. Logevall is apparently quite sympathetic to Communist philosophy, blind to the horrors of totalitarian implementation, completely mistrustful of United States foreign policy actions and motivations and complaisant about Eastern European enslavement post WWII. a) Pages 184,194,217,226,316,338: Logevall continually refers to,” Washington’s hegemonic position” or “America’s imperialist record,’ without any justification. b) Pages 223, 321: Logevall continually dismisses the “Domino Theory as, “always an odd theory,” then quotes Liu Shaoqi, (Mao’s principal lieutenant) “It is important to liberate Laos,” and later on during Geneva Negotiations outlines the Chinese and Viet Minh positions seeking to legitimize the Communist parties in Cambodia and Laos (Pathet Lao) by giving each large sections of their respective countries. c) Page 228: Logevall never acknowledges Stalin’s arbitrary oppression of Eastern Europe; he states, “Stalin had to meet its commitments in Eastern Europe.” Right, putting millions of non-believers to death. d) Page 430: Logevall never acknowledges the extent of Soviet spying in the U.S. ( read Witness, by Whittaker Chambers) , the reference is to, “anticommunist witch hunt in the State Department.” Completely unnecessary to this otherwise fine historical effort.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Simply the best writing and the best analysis of the French Indochina War of 1945-54 and how the U.S. came to take it over from the French. The Pulitzer Prize was given for this outstanding history which until this book was published had never been fully explained. If you want to understand how American got involved in a land 10,000 miles away with no direct U.S. interest, you must read "Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam." It is a gripping story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Superb summary of the background to US participation in the Vietnam war. The details about the behind-the-scenes role of Eisenhower are a revelation. Indispensable if you wish to know what a cusp of inevitability and chance the modern world was founded on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago