Emma's War

Emma's War

by Deborah Scroggins, Kate Reading
4.6 6

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Emma's War 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book intelligently weaves Sudan's history with western intervention and Emma, the naive, reckless and ultimately tragic heroine. It is an enthralling tale. I found it difficult to put the book down. It also raises important issues about the nature of humanitarian aid -- how it can become just another resource for rival groups to fight over, or instigate rival groups into using non-combatants/refugees as a means to manipulate or channel aid flows to regions of political and economic significance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book and learned so much about African history. (and a lot of American political involvement as well) The story revolves around Emma, an British aide worker in Africa, but goes deeper into the motivation of people that do this kind of work, and then the environments they find themselves in. I was especially moved by the writing of the author about her own travels to Africa. Her testimony was heartbreaking and real and put you right there with her. An excellent writer, Scroggins has the ability to give us all the facts of a journalistic history report, while conveying the emotions of Emma in the same beat. This is an excellent choice for anyone who wants something more than fluff that you can sink your teeth into. I usually fly through books, but took my time on this one to take in all the history and politics. Well done!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a fascinating account of not only an idealistic young woman but of a region of the world completely misunderstood. Scroggins descriptions of life in southern Sudan were sad, depressing but eye opening. 2 million dead and very little hope in sight. Emma certainly did help, but whom?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Compelling . . . timely . . . beautifully written. I knew little about Sudan and I was hooked from the start. Scroggins is both critical and compassionate. She presents an in-depth account of the secular-Muslim conflict within Sudan as well as the politics of the Western relief organizations, and she leaves the reader with a sense of her love for Sudan. Very enjoyable and informative.