Endless Encores: Repeating Success Through People, Products, and Profits

Endless Encores: Repeating Success Through People, Products, and Profits

by Ken Goldstein

Hardcover

$22.32 $22.95 Save 3% Current price is $22.32, Original price is $22.95. You Save 3%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Thursday, October 25  Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Overview

Endless Encores: Repeating Success Through People, Products, and Profits by Ken Goldstein

As difficult as it is to have your first big success, most people find it exponentially harder to repeat success. So many of us, after "bringing the crowd to its feet," worry that we're going to get booed off the stage with our next venture. Is there a way to avoid this, to have multiple hits and "endless encores?"Technology executive and bestselling author Ken Goldstein shows the way to repeating success by concentrating on three essentials – people, products, and profits, in that order. In this affecting and instructive business parable, he tells the story of a man who has accomplished much but now fears exposure as a fraud and the woman who, as a CEO with multiple successes to her credit, shows him the secret to consistent achievement.Are you ready to play endless encores? If so, this is your story.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781611882087
Publisher: Story Plant
Publication date: 09/22/2015
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Ken Goldstein advises start-ups and established corporations in technology, entertainment, media, and e-commerce. He served as chief executive officer and chairman of the board of SHOP.COM, a market leader in online consumer commerce acquired by Market America. He previously served as executive vice president and managing director of Disney Online, and as vice president of entertainment at Broderbund Software. Earlier in his career he developed computer games for Philips Interactive Media and Cinemaware Corporation, and also worked as a television executive. He is active in children’s welfare issues and has served on the boards of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Greater Los Angeles, Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services, and Full Circle Programs, and is involved in local government. He speaks and teaches frequently on topics of leadership, executive management, and innovation. He and his wife Shelley, who teaches English as a Second Language, make their home in Southern California. He is the author of one previous book, the novel THIS IS RAGE, which is currently being prepared for a Broadway production.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Endless Encores: Repeating Success Through People, Products, and Profits 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Your customer is your real boss," so be sure to "love your customer." This dives straight to the beating heart of Ken Goldstein's concise, entertaining, and excellent business parable. The sentiment may seem obvious for anyone running a business, non profit, youth hockey team, or and any other kind of organization that fills needs and creates value. "Endless Encores'" driving philosophy--the thing that brings real meaning--is the author's underlying mantra: "People. Products. Profits .... In that order." Goldstein creates a light-hearted, but sincere, chance conversation between a seasoned CEO and a young--and somewhat beleaguered--product manager to explore how "People. Products. Profits" can build powerful business and organizational cultures that work, and work well. This is not a book that pretends to offer readers a proven path to 100% success. It is, however, a wonderful articulation of some truly useful guiding principles. Want to build a great product? Then build a great team first. I recommend this book to business owners, executives, coaches, managers, and leaders at every level. It's light on tone and deep on impact.
ctfranklin28 More than 1 year ago
"Endless Encores" reminds me of one of the most life-changing books I have ever read, "The Traveler's Gift: Seven Decisions That Determine Personal Success". Like "The Traveler's Gift", "Endless Encores" is a short, but powerfully-messaged book about a journey of an individual from failure to mastery through the guidance of a mentor. "The Traveler's Gift" focused on life overall, while "Endless Encores" focused on the business sphere. Specifically, how do you create a good product after you received so much success for the first In the book, a newly promoted executive meets a billionaire in an airport and learns lessons that transforms his business. Like the lead character in "The Traveler's Gift" is an unwilling (at first) student is guided and nudged toward a journey in which he has to make choices. Goldstein does an excellent job (showing off his fiction writing skills) of describing that journey in simple turns that have elegant nuggets of wisdom. (I even wrote some of the information and I don't own a company.) He mentions in the intro that he is a fiction author, and I wholeheartedly agree. It's the kind of book that you read for business lessons and actually enjoy as leisure reading too and not realize how caught up in it you actually are. The book differs from "The Traveler's Gift" in a few significant ways.The lessons are not as direct. In "The Traveler's Gift", there is more of emphasis on following a code. In "Endless Encores", the focus is less about passing along a specific set of beliefs, and more about passing along a mindset. The lead character, Paul, remains the role of a student until the last part of a book where he starts to display some of the inherent power that his mentor (Daphne) sees in him. As a result, you don't get a handy little list of quotes like in "The Traveler's Gift", instead you get a lecture with a very wise businesswoman who is able to break down business into the simplest and most effective terms. I enjoyed reading it and gained a better insight into how I should approach business (and life) in general. Goldstein does an excellent job of using a story to serve as the vehicle of knowledge.