Enemy at the Gates: The Battle for Stalingrad

Enemy at the Gates: The Battle for Stalingrad

by William Craig
3.8 21

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Enemy at the Gates: The Battle for Stalingrad 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Emma Backe should stick to studying economics, and stop sniping heroic historic snipers; paricularly Russian women. Russia's female snipers were some of the greatest the world has ever seen. One example: Ludmilla Pavlichenko, a history graduate from Kiev University fought at the Battle of Odessa for 21 months. She then fought at Sevastopol for 8 months. She had 309 confirmed kills, of which 36 were German snipers themselves. One of the German snipers Pavlichenko killed had more than 500 French, English and Russian confirmed kills. Buy the book! War may not be romantic; but people like Ludmilla Pavlichenko are certainly inspiring.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i STRONGLY disagree with Miss. Back of what all she says!!! First of all snipers had a very large effect in the war..expecially in Stalingrad. Women did battle if they were skilled in the war, but not many. Vassili Zaitsev killed about or more than 300,000 germans. The book is true and also there was not enough equipment for the men so they had to stand in front of tanks and guns and weopons trying to block them..they were run over and more. if you tried to run..the russians shoot you in the back!!In some war one man can make a difference..in this situation Vassili Zaitsev did make a difference..without him Stalingrad would have been captured..russia would have been in control by germany..world war 11 would have a different ending..there could be no more of U.S. that we live in..it could be different. He did make a difference..and he was only one man..like frank churchill..he made a differece..he was important..snipers are important and you are wrong cause i come from the UCCP and my parents met Vassili Zaitsev and they have his stories of the war.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I storngly disagree with Ms.Backe,one good sniper can do so much to break a soldiers will to fight if he is always afraid to stick up his head for fear of getting it blown off. If there was no real value or need for snipers then the Military would not still have sniper training. During the Viet Nam war large rewards of rice and money were put on the head of one sniper by the name of Carlos Hathcock because the V.C. feared his ability and the impact on their soldiers moral.As for the book Enemy at the Gate i thought it was a very good book and to read such a good book is far better then any movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After you finish this book, you will never forget about this Soviet Union hero, Vassili.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an outstanding book. The entire time you feel like you are on the Volga, at the center of Stalingrad. This book is both dramatic and sombering. A must have.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The updated cover makes this book appear to be based on the movie, but reading it you'll find that the 'real' story of the battle for Stalingrad is much more intense. The movie is about 3 pages of the book. Loved the personal points of view, the short vignettes, and the detail from both sides.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book provides an inside look at the Battle of Stalingrad through the words of the soldiers from each side. Instead of a normal history book's telling of which army, division, corps or platoon attacked so-in-so, this book uses actual letters, documents and interviews to walk the reader through the battle and the ordeal that each side had to live through. This book is not an account of the battle between the Russian Sniper, Chief Master Sergeant Vasily Zaitsev and German Sniper, SS Colonel Heinz Tborvald, though they are mentioned a few times. Those interested in the sniper duel should read 'War of the Rats,' which is mixture of facts and fiction, providing a remarkably accurate account of the two snipers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
William Craig made his exelent book one of the best in my mind. I recomend it to all the Stalingrad and World War II buffs. An All-Star read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I never knew much about the eastern front during WWII. I got this book because I wanted to know more about the Stalingrad battle. This is a very good book. There are periods where it reads slow and fast, but it is a great history of what battle was like on that front. The author's description of the fighting, the weather, and the logistical problems that the German army had really tell the story well. This book is very balanced between the German and the Russian view of the conflict. I would recommend it for the credible work that the author does. This book was not written recently, but has been repackaged due to the upcoming movie. Still, I would rather have the book instead of the movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book (which has been turned into a movie) about a legendary duel between the top Russian and German snipers in Stalingrad. Lots of details about the battle in and outside of the city. I also recommend Grandfather's Tale-the Tale of a German Sniper.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i hate when people write reviews and have no idea of their history. Vassili Zaytsev has 242 confirmed kills. They say he has more than 400 unconfirmed kills. Not 3,000 or 30,000. Although he did open a sniper school later and trained men and they helped kill 3,000 people. As far as women in the Red Army..women DID play a large role. There were over 2,000 women alone in Rifle Division. That's a large number of women actually picking up a rifle and fighting along side men. Especially when you think back to WWII and what women did in that war [nurses]. Lyudmila Pavilichenko had 300 kills confirmed. If that isnt a women playing a role I dont know what is!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enemy at the Gates: The Battle for Stalingrad is an enthralling look at the chronology of events before and during the battle for Stalingrad. The author William Craig successfully weaves the different viewpoints of both the Russian and German participants in this battle to give the reader an excellent analysis of one of the key battles during the German offensive in to Russia during World War Two. Craig has taken the different testimonies of both officers and enlisted men, as well as official messages, to provide a very in-depth look in to both the tactics and the realities of the battle. It was evident from the beginning of this book that the author tried to take no definite stance on which side was morally or ethically responsible for the atrocities and losses; he shows the best and worst of both sides. This is possibly the greatest achievement of this book. By relying on testimonials and data has allowed Craig to refrain from coloring the novel with his own views. This is perhaps one of the greatest compliments one can give to a historian. Despite the very analytical approach taken by Craig in informing the reader about the battle of Stalingrad, he still manages to convey the raw emotion of the conflict. Craig includes stories ranging from the hopeful and uplifting to graphic and nauseating. These glimpses in to the realities of warfare help lend this piece a feeling of authenticity. These glimpses complement the tactical descriptions in the book to help the reader truly understand the battle for Stalingrad both tactically and psychologically. The tracking of so many different characters in the book reveals the different perceptions of the battle, as well as the war as a whole. Craig excels at taking the reader and putting them in the position of the characters in the story. He succeeds in showing that there was no true right and wrong, black and white, divide. In short, he humanized both sides. Although this book excels in most fields, there are are some lackluster elements. William Craig introduced multitudes of characters, and it was very difficult to keep all of the characters and their names separate. However, as the story progressed it became much easier. Also, there was little flow to the novel. Craig simply jumped from one testimonial to another, and sometimes the reason for the change of topic was not easily tangible. Nevertheless, this is an excellent book. The author clearly succeeds in retelling the battle of Stalingrad. There are some flaws, but they do not keep the brilliance of this book from shining through.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the best about Stalingrad. The sniper duel is only a small part of it, though. There are other books with more details about WW2 snipers, like War of the Rats, and Grandfather's Tale: the Tale of a German Sniper. Enemy at the Gates tells a lot more about things like Italian and Hungarian forces, etc.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great read about the greatest battle of the 20th century,just don't expect a novel here.This book reads like a history book which isn't a bad thing granted that's what you're looking for.It's just a account of the battle from the people that were in it.Also it has very little incommon with the movie(Zaitsev apears only thrice).But still if you want Stalingrad look no further than 'Enemy at the Gates'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read 'War of the Rats' by David L. Robbins. This novel was published a couple of years ago and the two stories would seem to have an uncanny similarity. Granted, they are based on the same situation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to start this short review by writing that I did not enjoy this book at all. It has no historical relevance allthough the author tried to make the book give a serious impression. In fact, no woman was ever even considered being a sniper and the situation for these snipers where everything but romantic or glamorous. And these two words, last mentioned, decribes the fictive situation for the snipers in this book. An additional problem with the story is that the author gives to much credit to these snipers. An army does not consist only generals or pilots or -like in this case: snipers, not one person can make such a big differens. In war the individual accomplish very little, but the collective can make anything and everything happen. If someone is interested in the situation for the russian snipers, among others ofcourse, I suggest you find another book -that might be Anthony Beevor's Stalingrad.