Energy, Justice, and Peace

Energy, Justice, and Peace

by Pontifical Congregation for Justice and Peace

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Overview

Energy, Justice, and Peace by Pontifical Congregation for Justice and Peace

A reflection of the Pontifical Council "Justice and Peace" on how energy is linked to justice and peace. The latter can, in fact, be threatened for all unresolved energy issues, while a healthy energy management can and should contribute to an integral, real, sustainable development.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780809149858
Publisher: Paulist Press
Publication date: 04/05/2016
Pages: 96
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)

Table of Contents

Preface Peter K. A. Card Turkson Mario Toso xi

Chapter 1 Introduction 1

1 The Interest of the Church in the Energy Question 1

2 Remembering the Role of Humanity in Relation to Creation 6

3 Explanation of Terms 7

Energy 7

Energy Sources 9

Renewable and Non-renewable Energy 10

Uses of Energy 11

Energy Reserves 13

Energy Question 14

Energy Efficiency 15

Distributed Generation 16

Energy-Related Activities 16

4 Energy and Development: A Historical Reading 16

Energy and Development in the History of Humanity 16

Energy and Human Progress 17

Evolution of Energy Development Models 17

5 Energy as an Indispensable Factor for Everybody 19

6 Energy, a Complex, Potentially Conflictual Factor 19

Chapter 2 Energy: The Challenge of Our Time, the Challenge for Justice and Peace 21

I Energy and Injustice 21

1 Unequal Distribution and Consumption on National Levels 21

2 Unequal Access to Technology on National Levels 22

3 Energy Access and Consumption on a Global and Individual Level 23

Inequalities on a Global and Individual Level 23

The Dramatic Situation in Less Developed Areas 24

Energy Poverty in Developed Countries 24

Inequality a Global Challenge 25

4 Imbalances in the Consequences of Energy Production and Consumption and of Resource Extraction 25

II Demand for Energy 27

1 Increased Needs and Demand 27

2 Limits to the Satisfaction of Energy Demand 28

Environment 28

Society, Economy, and International Competition for Non-renewable Energy Resources 30

III Obstacles to Energy Development 32

1 Centralized Systems and Distributed Systems: A Theoretical Opposition 32

2 Electricity Still Far from Isolated and Poor Areas 33

3 Corruption and Bad Governance 33

IV Particular Challenges 34

1 The Charm of Being Green and the Necessary Precautions 34

Exportation of Pollution 36

Management of Biofuels 36

2 Use of Wood as a Source of Energy 38

Mass Energy for Basic Needs 38

Impact of Deforestation on the Environment 39

Outdoor Pollution 40

Indoor Pollution 41

3 Sustailiability of Cities 41

Growing Cities with Growing Needs 41

(Un)Sustainable Cities 42

Poor Neighborhoods Bound to Fail? 43

4 Energy and Food Security 44

Scarcity of Food or Energy: Similar Situations 44

The Link between Food and Energy 44

5 Nuclear Energy 46

6 Water and Energy 48

7 The Inadequate International Energy Governance 49

The Inadequacy of Institutions 50

The Inadequacy of the Market "Alone" 51

V An Economic Model Called into Question 51

1 Irresponsible Profit Seeking 51

2 Unsustainable Life 52

3 The Limits of Poorly Formulated Approaches 53

VI Threats to Peace 53

Chapter 3 Energy, an Instrument for Real Development, Justice, and Peace 57

I Need for a New Energy Paradigm 57

1 Energy, a Common Good with a Universal Destination 58

Universal Destination and Its Implications 58

Sustainability 59

2 Searching, Promoting, and Providing Energy to Everyone in Compliance with Unavoidable Conditions 60

Technical Conditions 60

Socio-Economic Conditions 61

Cultural and Political Conditions 61

3 Conditional Support to the Initiatives of the United Nations 62

II Governance and Responsibility 62

1 Public Policies for Energy at the National Level 63

2 Policies at the International Level 64

Necessary International Governance 64

The Socio-Economic Objectives of the International Governance for Energy 64

The Geopolitical Objectives of the International Governance for Energy 66

3 The Responsibility of the State 67

4 Civil Society 68

III Principles for Energy Management 69

1 Point of Reference: The Human Person 69

2 The Principle of Justice in Its Various Articulations 70

3 An Approach in the Light of Subsidiarity 71

The Principle 72

Practical Application: Toward the Sustainability of Cities 74

Practical Application: Toward Rural Electrification 74

A Call for Responsibility in the Conception of New Projects 76

4 Solidarity between States 76

IV Technological Evolution 77

1 Hope and Encouragement 77

2 Prudence and Security 79

V Energy, Ethics, and Education 81

1 The Need for a Valid Ethical Approach 82

2 Education Is Fundamental 84

Chapter 4 Concrete Proposals 85

1 Change of the Energy Paradigm: Acting Quickly in the Name of Solidarity 85

2 Sound Energy Mixes 86

3 Favoring the Micro Level 87

4 Ambitious Goals 88

5 More and More Renewable Energy 88

6 Sobriety 89

7 The Participation of Civil Society 90

8 Recognizing Energy as a Prerequisite for Various Human Rights 91

9 An International Structure for Effective Governance 92

10 A Better Management of Resources 92

Chapter 5 Conclusion 95

Notes 97

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