English Words

English Words

by Francis Katamba

Paperback(Older Edition)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780415104685
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 09/28/1994
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 304
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Preface to the first edition
Preface to the second edition
Abbreviations
Key to symbols used

SECTION 1: THE NATURE AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF WORDS
1 Introduction
1.1 Why study words?
1.2 Overview of coming chapters

2 What is a word?
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Words are like liquorice allsorts
2.2.1 Word-forms
2.2.2 Words as vocabulary items
2.2.3 Grammatical words
2.3 Summary
Exercises

3 Close encounters of a morphemic kind
3.1 The quest for verbal atoms
3.2 Close morphological encounters: zooming in on morphemes
3.3 Morphemes and their disguises
3.3.1 Allomorphs: morph families
3.3.2 Contrast
3.3.3 The right mask
3.3.3.1 Phonologically conditioned allomorphs
3.3.3.2. Phonology in the back seat: lexical and grammatical conditioning
3.3.3.3 Madness without method: suppletion
3.4 Freedom and bondage
3.5 Sound symbolism: phonaesthemes and onomatopoeia
3.7 Summary
Exercises

4 Building words
4.1 Words and jigsaws
4.2 Know the pieces of the jigsaw
4.2.1 Roots are the core
4.2.2 Affixes are for appending
4.3 The main types of word-building: inflection and derivation
4.4 Derivation: fabricating words
4.4.1 Affixation: prefixes and suffixes
4.4.2 Conversion
4.4.3 Compound parade
4.4.4 Wishy-washy and razzle-dazzle words
4.5 Listing and institutionalisation
4.6 Keeping tabs on idioms
4.7 clitics
Exercises

SECTION 2: WORDS IN A WIDER CONTEXT
5. A lexicon with layers
5.1 The nature of the lexicon
5.2 Morphological information in the lexicon
5.3 Syntactic information in the lexicon
5.4 Does it ring true?(phonological information)
5.5 Rendezvous with lexical phonology and morphology
5.5.1 Neutral and non-neutral affixes
5.5.2 The lexicon is like a layered cake
5.6 Productivity, the time-warp and cranberries
5.7 Peeping beyond the lexicon
5.8 Base driven stratification
5.9 Summary
Exercises

6 Word meaning
6.1 Introducing meaning
6.2 Word-meaning
6.3 Sense and componential analysis
6.4 Semantic relations
6.4.1 Hyponymy
6.4.2 Synonymy
6.4.3 Antonymy
6.4.4 Homophones and homonyms
6.4.5 Polysemy
6.5 Semantic fields
6.6 Semantic prototypes : the birdiness rankings
6.7 Beyond the lexicon
6.8 Summary
Exercises

Section 3: A CHANGING EXPANDING LEXICON
7 A lexical mosaic: sources of English vocabulary
7.1 The nature of borrowing
7.1.1 Direct and indirect borrowing
7.1.2 Loanwords and loanshifts
7.1.3 Likely loans
7.1.4 Why borrow?
7.1.5 The grass is ever greener on the other side
7.1.6 Nativisation of loanwords
7.1.7 Effects of borrowing
7.2 Scandinavian loanwords
7.3 The French influence
7.3.1 The Norman French legacy
7.3.2 French words in modern English
7.4 Words from other modern European languages
7.5 Loanwords from non-European languages
7.6 The Germanic inheritance
7.7 Summary
Exercises

8 Words galore: innovation and change
8.1 A verbal bonanza
8.2 Jargon
8.3 Slang
8.4 Rhyming slang
8.5 Cliches and catch-phrases
8.6 A rose by any other name
8.6.1 Semantic widening
8.6.2 Semantic narrowing
8.6.3 Going up and down in the world
8.6.4 Loss account
8.6.5 Lexical revivals
8.7 Clipping
8.9 Fads and copycat formations
8.10 Back-formation
8.11 Blends
8.12 Geek-speak: internet slang and jargon
8.13 Euphemism
8.14 Summary
Exercises

9 Should English be spelt as she is spoke?
9.1 Writing systems
9.2 Is the English orthography mad?
9.2.1 The apparent madness in the English spelling system
9.2.2 There is a method in the madness: spelling rules and pronunciation
9.2.3 Is a for apple? Why vowel letters pinch like ill-fitting shoes
9.3 Morphological signposts in the spelling
9.4 Lexical signposting in the spelling
9.5 Spelling reform
9.6 Is speech degenerate writing?
9.7 Email and text messaging: imo email & txt r gr8
9.8 Summary
Exercises


SECTION 4: MODELLLING THE MENTAL LEXICON
10 Speech recognition
10.1 A mind full of words
10.1.1 Types of lexical information
10.1.2 The organisation of the mental lexicon
10.2 Modelling the mental lexicon
10.2.1 Morphological parsing
10.2.2 The full listing hypothesis
10.3 Speech recognition
10.3.1 Phonetic and phonological decoding
10.3.2 The role of high level information
10.3.3 Relevance theory
10.3.4 Psycholinguistic models of context
10.3.5 Exploiting syntactic and semantic clues
10.4 Speech recognition models
10.4.1 Factors influencing speech recognition
10.4.2 The cohort model
10.4.3 The TRACE and SHORTLIST models
10.5 Summary
Exercises

11 Speech production
11.1 Modelling speech production
11.2 Slips of the tongue as evidence for the model
11.2.1 Grammatical encoding errors
11.2 2 Grammatical encoding errors: inflection infelicities
11.2.3 Phonological encoding errors
11. 3 Selecting words
11.3.1 Networked lexical access
11.3.2 It's just on the tip of my tongue
11.3.3 Malapropisms
11.4 Aphasia
1.4.1 Broca's aphasia
11.4.2 Wernicke's aphasia
11.5 Summary
Exercises

Glossary
References
Indexes




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