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Europe's Angry Muslims: The Revolt of The Second Generation
     

Europe's Angry Muslims: The Revolt of The Second Generation

by Robert Leiken
 

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Europe's Angry Muslims traces the routes, expectations and destinies of immigrant parents and the plight of their children, transporting both the general reader and specialist from immigrants' ancestral villages to their new enclaves in Europe. It guides readers through Islamic nomenclature, chronicles the motive force of the Islamist narrative, offers

Overview


Europe's Angry Muslims traces the routes, expectations and destinies of immigrant parents and the plight of their children, transporting both the general reader and specialist from immigrants' ancestral villages to their new enclaves in Europe. It guides readers through Islamic nomenclature, chronicles the motive force of the Islamist narrative, offers them lively portraits of jihadists, and takes them inside radical mosques and into the minds of suicide bombers. Through interviews of former radicals and security agents and examination of the sermons of radical imams, Robert Leiken presents an unsentimental yet compassionate account of Islam's growing presence in the West. His nuanced and authoritative analysis-historical, sociological, theological and anthropological-warns that conflating rioters and Islamists, folk and fundamentalist Muslims, pietists and jihadis, and immigrants and their children is the method of strategic incoherence.

Now with a new preface analyzing the rise of ISIL, this book offers a cogent overview of how global terror and its responding foreign policy interacts with the lives of Muslim, first-and second generation immigrants in Europe.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Leiken (Why Nicaragua Vanished), director of the Immigration and National Security Program at the Center for the National Interest, explores “Muslim anger” in Britain, France, and Germany—the three European countries with the largest Muslim populations—in this extensively sourced and robustly argued treatise. Adopting a comparative approach, the author explores how rage has “played itself out” differently in different countries: riots in France, bombings in Britain. Leiken notes that “extremism in Europe is typically found not among migrants but among their children” and that radicalization has its roots most firmly in the “downward mobility” of the second generation. Leiken wisely includes case studies of individual mujahideen in each country to balance his scholarly focus. While his analysis stops short of recommending specific policies regarding homegrown mujahideen, the author clearly hopes that his study encourages governments to embrace “a theory of relativity in antiterrorism.” Timely and provocative, this is an important addition to the literature on Islamic terrorism. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews
An expert on national security challenges stereotypes of Islamic militancy and the threat it poses. Leiken (Why Nicaragua Vanished, 2003, etc.) analyzes social policies affecting Muslim immigrant communities in France, the U.K. and Germany, and how these have affected recruitment to Islamic jihadist organizations. Rejecting a one-size-fits-all categorization of Islam, he suggests that it is the "postmigrant" second-generation of young men who provide potential recruits for terrorist organizations in Europe and the United States, especially as they face a crisis of identity in a time of economic stagnation. The author draws the conclusion that the apparently socially repressive policies adopted by the French have proven to be most successful in dealing with a possible threat of terrorism, while the British face a serious problem. Migrants from Algeria are encouraged to view themselves as French and are expected to assimilate French culture. Leiken believes that the 2005 street riots were fueled by economic conditions rather than ideology. In contrast, the terrorist attack on the British subway system was ideologically motivated. The author attributes the rise of Islamic terrorism in the U.K. to British multiculturism. Leaders in Muslim communities received generous government subsidies and were expected to act as mediators for the Muslim population, which was not encouraged to assimilate. Migrant laborers generally maintain close ties to their native communities, which their children lack, leaving them vulnerable to terrorist recruitment. By offering apprenticeship programs and vocational training, Germans provided them a road to economic, if not social, integration and an alternative to radicalism. Leiken provides a historical, ethnic and socioeconomic context that identifies important differences as opposed to empty generalities. Both well written and researched—a valuable contribution to an ongoing discussion.
From the Publisher

"[Leiken] writes with eloquence, bringing to life the grim realities of the French banlieues and of the back-to-back houses of immigrant families in Leeds."-The Economist

"Leiken provides a historical, ethnic and socioeconomic context that identifies important differences as opposed to empty generalities. Both well written and researched-a valuable contribution to an ongoing discussion." - Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Timely and provocative, this is an important addition to the literature on Islamic terrorism." -Publisher's Weekly

"Leiken discusses Islamophobia and the extent to which Jihadist 'outsiders' manipulate those subjected to it for their own purposes, and emphasizes the need to distinguish between genuine Islamist political agitation and other forms of civil disobedience more rooted in socioeconomic tension."-Middle East Journal

"Leiken supports his anecdotal observations with the weight of academic and empirical studies, resulting in an immensely readable account that is also authoritative." -- Literary Review

"Robert Leiken has a long record of sober, empirical and deep analysis in a field that is often clouded by ideological biases. Europe's Angry Muslims demonstrates all of Leiken's strengths and is a welcome addition to our understanding of a problem that is likely to deepen over time. Essential reading." -Peter Bergen

"Robert Leiken's penetrating research and highly readable prose have brought alive some of the most dangerous terrorists Europe has seen. He uses their stories brilliantly to show us what their experiences do-and, importantly, what they do not-tell us about immigration and assimilation. 'Angry Muslims' recounts bleak tales of the recent past, to be sure, but Leiken's analysis leaves open the way to a more positive future." -Christopher Dickey, Newsweek

"Europe's Angry Muslims documents, in a particularly vivid way, the evolution of immigrant communities in Europe and the enormously diverse impacts of the varied counter terrorism strategies pursued by Britain, France and Germany. An important contribution to understanding one of the greatest challenges to democracy today." -Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University

"This balanced book combines first hand reporting, based on interviews of former radicals, scrutiny of court records, historical background, and cutting-edge analysis to capture the complex phenomenon of European Islam."--The New Statesman

"Never before has a book conveyed more hard-headedly how unwanted the Muslim migration to Britain was-and remains-by almost all parties, the newcomers not excepted.The poignant consequences for the typical immigrant's children are laid out by Leiken with literary skill." --The New Republic

"While learning about new worlds from Leiken's research, beware the unexpected turns; Europe's Angry Muslims is a troubling book to consume, for many reasons." ---Christian Science Monitor

"Part political scientist, part feature writer, Leiken paints an engaging portrait of European Muslim life. This is the greatest strength of Europe's Angry Muslims." --Standpoint

"Robert S. Leiken presents an engaging study of Muslims in Europe. The author, who defines himself as a 'connoisseur of slums,' takes us inside some of Europe's most notorious Muslims enclaves." --Arab News

The multiculturalist literature, with its tendency to pigeonhole people by culture, often fails to acknowledge the sheer diversity of this increasingly mixed-up world. More than ever, that must include the diversity to be found inside a single human skin, mind, and heart. These are not just 'immigrants.' Increasingly, they are people 'with a migration background,' as the German government classifies them, or 'postmigrants,' in Robert S. Leiken's snappier phraseology." --New York Review of Books

"[Leiken] is a wide-ranging, freethinking scholar... who lets his conclusions fall where they may, apparently without regard to intellectual trendiness or easily labeled political ideology."-Christian Science Monitor

"To call it a 'popular account' would capture how good a read the book is, but would scarcely capture the depth of the research he brings to bear on these questions."
-John R. Bowen, author of Why the French Don't Like Headscarves: Islam, the State, and Public Space

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195328974
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
12/30/2011
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Robert S. Leiken has been a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Center for International Affairs, the Carnegie Endowment, CSIS, and the Brookings Institution and director of the Immigration Program at The Center for the National Interest. His commentaries have appeared in many major U.S newspapers; his essays in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, The National Interest, The Weekly Standard and The Times Literary Supplement. He has authored books on immigration, Central America, and Soviet strategy. He is presently writing a memoir.

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