Eveolution: The Eight Truths of Marketing to Women

Eveolution: The Eight Truths of Marketing to Women

by Faith Popcorn, Lys Marigold
3.8 10

Hardcover

$21.09 $24.95 Save 15% Current price is $21.09, Original price is $24.95. You Save 15%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

EVEolution: The Eight Truths of Marketing to Women 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book deserves more than five stars! I am a big Faith Popcorn fan. That led me to go into reading this book with high expectations. What a great deal it was to have those expectations well exceeded! Tom Peters first raised the theme of this book in his book, The Circle of Innovation. The vast bulk of most consumer purchases are either made or strongly influenced by women. Stop marketing generally, and be sure you marketing is gender friendly in the broadest sense. But Tom, as a man, could only take that point so far. Faith Popcorn has really explained it very well. She has identified 8 key principles: (1) Women link (the marketer's job is to make that easier for women -- witness the success of women-only Web sites) (2) Serve all of a woman's needs, not just the ones she has part of the day (if she needs convenient ordering, be sure to offer everything she wants to buy conveniently -- take-out foods for all meals) (3) Women want their needs anticipated (if she has to tell you what she wants, it's all over -- lots of work, stress, home responsibilities and money mean that home spas are doing well) (4) Use the indirect approach (women prefer to notice things on their own and apply them, rather than getting a direct, hard sell -- women notice institutional appliances in great restaurants and put them into their own kitchens) (5) Go to her and make it easy (witness the success of at-home direct selling) (6) Sell one generation of women, and you get the next as well (see how children now dress like adults at a very young age, because Mom and daughter want to look like each other) (7) Take on a role as a trustworthy adult to help women, and they will link with your brand (GE Financial Assurance provides a mentor role for women entrepreneurs) (8) All the details matter (organic foods are taking off because they are healthier, even though very expensive). As interesting as these points are, Faith Popcorn also deserves praise for the superb way she explains her ideas. In the beginning of the book, she has one example of each concept. Then there is a chapter on each principle. The chapter has many examples, and finalizes with one thorough one drawn from her consulting experience. Then, to be sure you've got the point, she takes well-known brands in each chapter and points out what they are NOT doing that they should be. The crowning glory is a chapter on all of the things that Ron Perelman and Revlon are doing wrong, and compares it with how the brand was run originally. Faith couldn't find much of anything she likes about the Revlon approach. As a matter of fact, the company has done poorly. But, at a broader level, this book is also about marketing in the 21st century. Although the focus of the book is women, those who market to men will often benefit from following the same advice. Saturn, a role model she describes, is not just appealing to women. Men like to be treated like people, too, when they buy a car. As a loyal Saturn owner, I know the approach worked well with me. I can hardly wait for her next book! Have a great time as marketers begin to apply these principles,
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book demeans women. We are portrayed as so simple-minded that we have emotional relationships with products and brands. Ridiculous! And the authors' suggestions on how to further exploit women as marketing targets provides to some near-hilarious 'insights'.....except that they're dead serious! Don't waste your money on this one. It's lighter than popcorn....
Guest More than 1 year ago
We should all live so long that we recyle ideas from decades ago. Faith Popcorn makes her living seeing the future. In this book, she's seeing the past. Women aren't 'shop-o-logically' different from men. We simply want the best value for our money and we aren't interested in marketing gimmicks supposedly tailored to our gender. As the marketing chief of a Fortune 1000 company, I can tell you what the authors suggest will have more impact on the political-correctness bottom line than any company's financial bottom line. This book is silly, at best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Faith Popcorn has written a very insightful marketing book that is right on target with her 8 truths. Women love to shop. They make the majority of purchases in the marketplace and are very influential in determining which products are a success and which ones fail. Management must sit up and take notice of this fact. Popcorn's book is must reading for all management.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At last . . . a book that recognizes the power of the female consumer. Companies would be wise to learn from Ms. Popcorn's insights. She articulates herself very well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While the marketing world is distracted by the ecommerce phenomenon, the real battle will be fought over the hearts, minds and wallets of women. Faith Popcorn and Lys Marigold recognizes this, and their new book is a fabulous exploration of the ways in which companies and brands can, and must, establish dynamic and growing relationships with their female customers. Never one for dabbling in the margins or grandly offering modest tweaks as business-changing innovations, as so many self-proclaimed marketing mavens do, Faith and her savvy co-author truly offer ways to alter, in a fundamental fashion, the structure of consumer branding and communication. To implement these changes requires a generous corporate spirit and, to a large extent, the abolition of the command-and-control military model that still directs most corporations. I commend this book to anyone who is even remotely a practitioner of consumer marketing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Everyday, we take care of our children, spouse, friends, family, and household responsibilities in addition to working at full-time job. Thank you Faith Popcorn for sharing your insights with corporate America on what makes women valued customers. These lessons (which may seem obvious to many women) certainly have been overlooked by many companies that want our business. As an independent business woman, I strongly support Ms. Popcorn's modern views on how to build relationships with woman, first as individuals and second as consumers. I only hope enough people share her insights and get the message out to the many businesses whose decisions affect women on a daily basis.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am part of Corporate America - just like my father (my mother taught Jr. High for 30 years - thanks mom). All I can say is Corporate America doesn't get it - and Faith does. Reading her latest book, I felt that she is trying to get the companies to understand me and do things I want - treat me intelligently, not JUST as my father's daughter or my brother's sister or my husband's wife. As a female consumer (and citizen) I wish all CEOs read this book and treat their female customers and staff differntly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although I feel that this book contains much insight into women and making essential connections with them, I would not recommend it to any independent beauty consultants (as is being done by the corporate office) due to the conflict of philosophy our company holds. The other thing to note in this book is that there is a definite undertone of male-bashing feminism.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a big Faith Popcorn fan. That led me to go into reading this book with high expectations. What a great deal it was to have those expectations well exceeded! Tom Peters first raised the theme of this book in his book, The Circle of Innovation. The vast bulk of most consumer purchases are either made or strongly influenced by women. Stop marketing generally, and be sure you marketing is gender friendly in the broadest sense. But Tom, as a man, could only take that point so far. Faith Popcorn has really explained it very well. She has identified 8 key principles: (1) Women link (the marketer's job is to make that easier for women -- witness the success of women-only Web sites) (2) Serve all of a woman's needs, not just the ones she has part of the day (if she needs convenient ordering, be sure to offer everything she wants to buy conveniently -- take-out foods for all meals) (3) Women want their needs anticipated (if she has to tell you what she wants, it's all over -- lots of work, stress, home responsibilities and money mean that home spas are doing well) (4) Use the indirect approach (women prefer to notice things on their own and apply them, rather than getting a direct, hard sell -- women notice institutional appliances in great restaurants and put them into their own kitchens) (5) Go to her and make it easy (witness the success of at-home direct selling) (6) Sell one generation of women, and you get the next as well (see how children now dress like adults at a very young age, because Mom and daughter want to look like each other) (7) Take on a role as a trustworthy adult to help women, and they will link with your brand (GE Financial Assurance provides a mentor role for women entrepreneurs) (8) All the details matter (organic foods are taking off because they are healthier, even though very expensive). As interesting as these points are, Faith Popcorn also deserves praise for the superb way she explains her ideas. In the beginning of the book, she has one example of each concept. Then there is a chapter on each principle. The chapter has many examples, and finalizes with one thorough one drawn from her consulting experience. Then, to be sure you've got the point, she takes well-known brands in each chapter and points out what they are NOT doing that they should be. The crowning glory is a chapter on all of the things that Ron Perelman and Revlon are doing wrong, and compares it with how the brand was run originally. Faith couldn't find much of anything she likes about the Revlon approach. As a matter of fact, the company has done poorly. But, at a broader level, this book is also about marketing in the 21st century. Although the focus of the book is women, those who market to men will often benefit from following the same advice. Saturn, a role model she describes, is not just appealing to women. Men like to be treated like people, too, when they buy a car. As a loyal Saturn owner, I know the approach worked well with me. I can hardly wait for her next book! Have a great time as marketers begin to apply these principles, providing a better consumer experience for customers and more business success for their companies. One trend she did not explicitly address are the many consumer goods companies that are converting to having mostly women in product design and marketing. That should help, too. Donald Mitchell, Coauthor of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution