Everyman

Everyman

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged, 5 CDs, 5 hrs. 30 min.)

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Overview

Everyman by Philip Roth, George Guidall

The bestselling author of "The Plot Against America" now turns his attention to one man's lifelong confrontation with mortality in this fiercely intimate yet universal story of loss, regret, and stoicism. Unabridged. 5 CDs.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781419387234
Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date: 04/28/2006
Edition description: Unabridged, 5 CDs, 5 hrs. 30 min.
Pages: 5
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 5.20(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

In 1997 Philip Roth won the Pulitzer Prize for American Pastoral. In 1998 he received the National Medal of Arts at the White House and in 2002 the highest award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Gold Medal in Fiction. He has twice won the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He has won the PEN/Faulkner Award three times. In 2005 The Plot Against America received the Society of American Historians’ Prize for “the outstanding historical novel on an American theme for 2003-2004.” Recently Roth received PEN’s two most prestigious awards: in 2006 the PEN/Nabokov Award and in 2007 the PEN/Bellow Award for achievement in American fiction. Roth is the only living American novelist to have his work published in a comprehensive, definitive edition by the Library of America. In 2011 he received the National Humanities Medal at the White House, and was later named the fourth recipient of the Man Booker International Prize.

Hometown:

Connecticut

Date of Birth:

March 19, 1933

Place of Birth:

Newark, New Jersey

Education:

B.A. in English, Bucknell University, 1954; M.A. in English, University of Chicago, 1955

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Everyman 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
IEB More than 1 year ago
I'm happy that this novel was so short in length. I don't know why Philip Roth needed to write this unless it was all about him. It was very much of a disappointment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the first book I have read by Philip Roth. Even though it was very depressing, it was hard to put it down. He writes very descriptively and one gets avery clear picture of what he is saying. As to the essence of the book he pictures this man, and therefore life, in general, as nothing but a series of bad experiences with the BIG LAST EXPERIENCE AS DEATH. One can focus on this type of jouney of life or one can focus on all the beautiful and wonderful aspects of life. This is what we have been given by our maker. This is what we have on this earth. It is up to us to do with it what we will. Do the best we can, make a difference, be morally upright and be at peace when our time is up.
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cab6776 More than 1 year ago
Philip Roth pulls together feelings about "everymans" ordinary life. The sometimes unspeakable truth about how good men deal with bad situations is revieled in a short but topical novel. Divorce, children, affairs, and repenting are all dicussed in a poinyant yet subtle story. For men who dont like to discuss their feelings to women who jsut don't understand what makes men do some of the things they do, "Everyman" explains a lot. This is a very easy read. Great for novice readers. Probably PG-13 at a minimum.
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toomanybooks More than 1 year ago
I am not yet finished with EVERYMAN BUT AM really enjoying reading it. Being Jewish myself, i can relate to the details surrounding the funeral. We have all been there. I love just about everything Philip Roth writes and this is no exception. I happened to come upon it in a thrift store and had to have it. His details are so perfect. His writing is so sincere. I continue to be a fan.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I very much enjoyed the character development and manner Roth chose to tell this story. I'm afraid many will relate all to closely to the choices made by this man, choices with a negative impact on everyone in his family. It's really a story of how we shouldn't live our lives, at least from a moral perspective. Here was a talented and successful, hard working man, who missed what is really important in this one chance we get. If conveying this message was Mr. Roth's intent then the point is well made.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the 15th century English morality play Everyman, the titular character is summoned by Death and learns that no other friends, worldly goods nor beauty will go with him -- none except good deeds. In American author Philip Roth's identically named latest novel, the protagonist ponders whether he possesses much of any of those things in the first place. The novel opens at the burial of the unnamed protagonist, where Roth clumsily makes two characters deliver eulogies that outline his life to the reader. Rising from a working-class Jewish childhood in New Jersey to become a New York advertising man, he spent his last years at a private retirement community on the Jersey shore. He is close to his daughter and his elder brother, but also has three failed marriages and two estranged sons. As the narrative moves back in time to the protagonist's own thoughts as he awaits surgery, the reader learns he has had his share of the good and the bad. But the defining characteristics of his life is his battle for it not to end. In and out of hospital for various bodily failures all his life, from a hernia in his childhood to collapsing arteries in his old age, much of his musings are on the failty of the human body. Roth devotes large chunks of text to describing hospital stays and operations, and the descriptions are admirable in detail and depressing in content. The deterioration of the protagonist's body over the years also physically parallels the deterioration of his life over the years. His life succumbs to forces he cannot seem to control -- generally emotional, frequently sexual. Betraying a series of wives because he lusts and longs for someone or something else, he leaves behind a trail of wounded women and confused children. These dysfunctional relationships make up the bulk of the novel, and he recalls his past decisions with a mixture of regret and resignation. Unfortunately, it can be hard to care about any of these characters -- and consequently, the protagonist himself -- since Roth seems content to leave them as sketches, without quirks and inconsistencies. There is the successful elder brother, the vulnerable daughter, the trinity of ex-wives 'shrew, saint and ditz, respectively', and even a wise gravedigger who appears at the end to provide an epiphany. Perhaps Roth intended his characters, like in a morality play, to embody various human virtues and vices. In any case, they are trotted in for the protagonist to muse upon what it means to be human, without being convincingly human themselves.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've admired Philip Roth's work since high school, when I read 'Conversion of the Jews' in a short story/novella class. I was intrigued by Sabbath's Theater 'is anyone beyond redemption?', very moved by American Pastoral 'a great American novel about the myth of the American Dream', and amazed by The Human Stain 'American 'morality' shown for the hypocrisy so many have let it become'. And now, with Everyman, Philip Roth has done it again. This story is nothing less than a contemplation on mortality as seen through the failing of one human being's anatomy. It's a short novel, but it's filled to brimming with passion, ideas, and the question of what it is that truly defines what it means to exist (while thinking every day, in the back of one's mind, of how death is the greatest mystery and one from which nothing that breathes may ever escape). Though it may seem an intensely moribund novel, it is, considered in its entirety, incredibly moving - even life affirming. Philip Roth has taken an ordinary human being and, without falling on cheaply contrived authorial mechanics (quite a feat), has presented an unnamed person 'all of us, really' in a manner that is as complex as it is inevitable. I will not go into plot, for doing so would threaten to lessen the experience for one who has yet to read this novel. And though I feel ambivalent about awards 'where aesthetics exist, they are prickly things', were it that, with Everyman, Philip Roth received a second Pulitzer, I would feel that some form of literary justice had been served. With each novel, Philip Roth again does something he accomplished long ago: he proves himself one of the great writers in American fiction.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wow just wow, a book about the story of a life of a New Jersey Jewish immagrant. Although it is fiction it makes a great case for the lives that everyday people live. Travel through the life of one man who as the book starts out dies, and have him grow on you as you get further in the book. Some of his decisions and actions are unforgiveable but you learn how the person that commits them lives with them, which is just a great insight into the minds of ordinary people, as this book, Everman, can symbolize my or even your life as it unfolds, getting sick, having family problems, lossing loved ones, and comming to an old age and dying.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Everyman ' the newest novel by Philip Roth is a huge disappointment for me, as I usually enjoy every novel from this talented writer. Though Mr. Roth writes well there is no question about his ability to write, the question is where's the story. I was thoroughly bored with the character the novel is about. Opening on his death and burial then back to his life, seems to be filled with his preoccupation of his health, sickness and surgeries. When not dealing with his, Roth has chosen to comment on others that surround him. I would like to think that it is only because this story is depressing, but I do believe that it is because this is a not an interesting story to tell. A novel needs to be written well but I think it also must have a good story. I look forward to the next novel Mr. Roth writes and will hope he finds himself a different muse.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Philip Roth¿s `Everyman¿ is a tale especially appropriate to our time and situation. In tracing the life and death, and above all, the old age of his protagonist and everyman a retired thrice- married and thrice- divorced commercial artist he gives an insight into what most of us have already experienced some of , and will probably know a great deal of before we leave the world. He gives a chilling chronicle of what Old Age does to people. In what I found to be the most instructive passage of the book he reflects after speaking to three former colleagues each devastated in his own way on the end of life. ¿Had he been aware of the mortal suffering of every man and woman he happened to have known during all his years of professional life, of each one¿s painful story of regret and loss and stoicism , of fear and panic and isolation and dread, had he learned of every last thing they had parted with that once had been vitally theirs and of how, systematically, they were being destroyed , he would have had to stay on the phone through the day and into the night, making another hundred calls at least. Old age isn¿t a battle it¿s a massacre.¿ Roth gives a sympathetic picture of a hero who has come to the end of his life, cut off from most of those he should be close with. But he also portrays vividly the joys and loves of that life, its major decisions and foul- ups. And in telling nuanced dialogue it sets forth the complex set of relations between the protagonist and his one loving daughter, two resentful sons, and the second wife whose abandonment has been his greatest crime and failure. This book does not have the comic genius of some of Roth¿s earlier work, but it does have a sober, sensitive insightful and ultimately moving portrayal of what the human being goes through at the end of days. Whether it is a masterpiece is a question, it certainly is a most outstanding instance of that Literature which sees deeply into Life, and enhances it.