An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination: A Memoir

An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination: A Memoir

by Elizabeth McCracken
3.8 39

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Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
CFay More than 1 year ago
An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination is the truest representation of living through the loss of a child I have ever read. Since I lost my newborn son 18 months ago, I have read MANY books designed to "help" with the grief following a loss as devastating as losing a baby. None of them touched me or seemed to truly understand the total devastation of losing your infant like this book did. The author does a perfectly eloquent job of addressing all the seemingly innocent things people do or say in their best efforts to be comforting that can send a grieving parent into a spiral of grief. I also appreciated the light at the end of tunnel she provides in the hope of the love of a subsequent child. Even though the hole torn in your heart by the loss of your child always remainsand you will never again look at life as you did before your loss, the author provides the hope that finding a new normal is possible. After the death of my son, many people in my life told me that they "could never understand" what we had been through. And, it's true that unless you have lost a child, you can never really understand(and I hope you never do), but this book does such a perfect job of shedding light on the experience that I would hand it to anyone who wants to try to understand the loss. I recommend this the book to anyone who has ever suffered the loss of a child. I also recommend this book to anyone who loves someone who has lost a child.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been reading Elizabeth McCracken since her first novel, "The Giant's House" came out. That one was great! She had me hooked. I've read "Niagara Falls All Over Again" and while I didn't love it as much it is darn good. Then her collection of short stories "Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry?" - which I plan to reread again. So, I was so pleased to find her newest book "An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination." This book is like nothing else I've ever read. A wonderfully touching and insightful personal story of her loss and her hope that made me smile and also cry. I highly recommend this and any other of her books. You won't regret it!
L.A.Carlson-writer More than 1 year ago
This engaging and witty memoir is about loosing a child but it is also about how others react in times of loss. I found it to be exactly right on and while I have lost several family members none of those was a child.
We really find out how emphathic people are when someone dies. It seems to me there are two kinds of emphathy, the one that suggests people can only relate when they have indeed lost and then, there's the other one.
The truest type of emphathy which involves feeling compassion for a situation regardless if you have experienced it or not. It also seems obvious if ever there was a person who deserves happiness with her child it would be Elizabeth McCracken.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Elizabeth McCracken is an award winning, happily single author in her late thirties. But when she meets Edward Carey, they fall in love and get married. Both have wanderlust and it is in France where she disover she is expecting their first child. They spend an idyllic nine months waiting for the birth of 'Pudding', the pet name given to the unborn baby boy. However, tragedy strikes at the eleventh hour. McCracken's son is stillborn. How does one deal with such sorrow? How do you go forward? An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination is the story of that pregnancy and loss, written after birth of her second child, a little more than a year later. 'This is the happiest story in the world with the saddest ending.' I felt like I was privy to McCracken's journal, reading of the joy, anticipation, hurt, anger and grief that she and her husband went through. She is unwavering in her honesty, sharing her most intimate thoughts and emotions. I haven't (yet) read any of her novels, but was captured by the way she uses words to paint vivid descriptions. ' Just then another would-be renter showed up, a yellow-clad lawyer from Boston, with wooden skin and leaden hair and the official dreary insinuating underfed brittle aura of a number 2 pencil'. Whether you are a parent or not, this is a personal and moving memoir that will touch you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿This is the happiest story in the world with the saddest ending.¿ Elizabeth McCracken courageously shares her pain at giving birth to a stillborn child and the joy at the birth of a healthy child. Pregnancy was a happy time for the couple. When Pudding was still born, they never expected the sun to shine again. McCracken shares the deep pain. Her words paint a picture of her great grief. She shares the self-doubt and the self-incrimination. With the second pregnancy came anxiety and joy. McCracken¿s story is one many women can relate to. She clearly displays the emotions she faced. Her style is conversational. This is not an easy book to read. McCracken made me feel her pain. The birth of Pudding will leave you sad. However, hope and joy triumph in the end with the birth of Gus. Gus could never replace Pudding, but he has his own place in life.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was surprised by this book. It was unexpectedly wry, irreverent and very funny in many parts (who would have thought it?). Gut-wrenching and unspeakable loss is dealt with with clarity and truth by a brave and talented author. This book is very special. It is a triumph. I wished there were more and it were longer, though I can see why the author may not have wished for the same. I hope it was cathartic for her to write but my guess is, like Joan Didion's 'The Year of Magical Thinking', it may not have been that simple...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book for an assignment in my Concepts of Death and Dying graduate course. Elizabeth McCracken is a great writer. I wouldn't have typically picked up this type of book but it was well written and interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RA1 More than 1 year ago
Having just lost my son to stillbirth at 38 weeks just one month ago, I found this book to be a window to my soul. I did not want it to be over because I had found someone who totally understood my emotions. She has many poignant observations. Thank you to the author for allowing us to see her raw emotions and also seeing that there are reasons to hope!
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