The Expected One (Magdalene Line Series #1)

The Expected One (Magdalene Line Series #1)

by Kathleen McGowan
4.0 113

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The Expected One (Magdalene Line Series #1) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 113 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got about 3/4 of the way through this book before putting it in a box for my next yard sale. It seemed to me I'd read it before, and then I realized I had--The Da Vinci Code. Different plot line, but the same tired elements rehashed in an even less palatable format. If the author really took twenty years to do research for this story, she should have put that time to better use. I'm just sorry I paid retail.
annsafron More than 1 year ago
I breezed through 279 pages of the heroine running around in designer suits, staying in expensive hotels and castles before I got to the scrolls written by Mary Magdalene. It struck me as unbelievable that all the women mentioned in those scrolls were noble, beautiful and instantly Christian, while the men (excluding Jesus) were cruel and driven only by ambition. And the heroine even gains a boyfriend in the end! This book seems well-constructed to appeal to women's fantasies rather than the truth about the abuse and inequalitly women has suffered over the centuries.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Historically inaccurate. Tedious reading. Sorry, but I just dont see where it's worth the hype, unless of course you're fourteen years old.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The subject of this book should have been fertile ground for outstanding fiction - however, the author did a poor job of telling this story. The heroine, Maureen, comes across as a dimwitted romance novel heroine who has all of these remarkable and confusing experiences, but doesn't understand any of them unless someone gives her a full narrative explanation. She seems incapable of reasoning her way through a problem and must be lead around by the other characters. There was no opportunity for suspense and anticipation to grow - the author gives up the goods almost as soon as the questions are posed. The best part of the book are the excerpts describing Mary Magdalene and Jesus' lives. I don't know how she can write the 'flashback' parts so well, and the rest of it so flatly. In fact, the discrepancy in quality between the story and the 'flashbacks' almost lends credibility to her claim that the story is autobiographical. It is as if the vivid colors and rich quality of the 'flashbacks' are due to her reporting them exactly as she experienced them or found them, and the rest of the story had to be created as a vehicle for them. It made me want to read the gospel that the heroine finds, but left me with no care for the heroine herself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Da Vinci Code,' for all its flaws, is a better read. McGowan's protagonist, Maureen, reminds one of the romance heroines of the 1970s. She's oblivious to all that is swirling around her, needs someone else to explain things to her and is a passive damsel in distress always rescued by someone else. We are told repeatedly she is attractive, petite, well groomed, immaculately tailored, professional, academic, skeptical, rational and¿most of all¿sane. Tammy, her apparent alter ego, is wild, free, exotic, well-connected and in the know¿which is good because her best friend is not. However, this character's dialogue is stilted and an obvious dumping ground for information and assertions McGowan hasn't found a better way of handling. The plot runs thin, with plot points and scenes imitating 'The Da Vinci Code'. The major 'revelations' are not backed up by any factual or scholarly resources. Her characters are thinly drawn. The dialogue is a little too familiar for some of the character pairings, and the information just spills out in a somewhat messy, disorganized way. The end is unrealistic and unsatisfying.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Readers familiar with the over-hyped Rennes-le-Chateau tale will have no difficulty recognizing the inspirations for Kathleen McGowan's predictable work of fiction. She repeats nearly verbatim the same litany of discredited pseudo-historical errors as the authors of Holy Blood, Holy Grail and the long list of non-fiction titles that have expanded on the theme from diverse angles for more than two decades. There is little accurate and nothing new or different about the factual lacunae that riddle this plodding, inert homage to the author's personal quest to paint herself as the culmination of the sacred bloodline--The Expected One in the flesh. The plotline is juvenile, the characters stale, and the entire premise a self-serving hype. Avoid.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author of this book has provided us, in her own words, why this book should be avoided. She wrote this book based on what she swears are her visions, but as for attacking other authors who do the same, she has this to say about Sylvia Browne and her book, the 'Mystical Life of Jesus.' 'Please be very very wary of anyone who puts herself on a book cover in full technicolor with a title like 'If you could see what I see' or whatever whatever elititist tripe. Ick. '' Then she goes on to advise us all that only her visions and her book are valid dreams:: 'There is an element of 'Truth against the World' that makes it imperitive for me to speak out against the phonies that become superstars in the name of 'spiritual publishing.' Oh my God. What elitist dillusions are these in the mind of McGowan?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I can't believe anyone wrote a good review of this book. Probably all the 5 stars were submitted by the author's friends...because this book is awful beyond belief. Poorly written and self serving egotism in the xtreme. And she's got her facts so screwed up that I didn't know whether to burst out laughing or worry about her mental health. The Cathars served a typical Cathar dinner? Like they were an ethnic group in France like in Provence? Does she really know so little of French history? Pass on this one. It's an insult to intelligence.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book expecting a lot more. I was greatly disappointed... nothing but rehashed story line that was weak and sporadic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was really excited about this book b/c I really enjoyed Dan Brown's books and wanted to read more. But I was alittle disappointed. I felt like her characters were flat and we never really got to know them as anything more than just the lady having visions and the people around her. I also thought that the flashbacks to Mary Magdalene's Gospel could have been better written to reflect the time period. I will say that once I found out that the Author believes SHE is in the bloodline of Mary Magdalene & Jesus and that she is the 'expected one,' I had a hard time taking the book seriously and finishing it. Wait until it is in paperback!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although the excerpts of the possible writings of Mary Magdalene are interesting better books have done a better job of brining her to life. Life is what this book lacks. The characters especially the main characters are for the most part boring. The dialogue stilted and the situations in which the heroine finds herself just too convenient to move this very slow moving book along. H. vanRaan New York City
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel drags along, the plot slowly and unexcitedly coming to a blatently flat climax. I am sick of Mary Magdalene being portrayed as someone of greater importance than she was. I feel that this book is another ploy of feminist activists to push to the front of the 'superiority line.' If anyone knew any history at all they would see how off the author is on the actual Mary Magdalene gospel. The actual chances that Mary Magdalene wrote the gospel itself are one out of a million! The Gospel of Mary Magdalene was a gnostic gospel written around 100 a.d. Gnostic meaning it was basically written by a cult worshipping an aspect of the Christian faith. In this case being Mary Magdalene. This novel is purely fiction (something the other reviewers need to realize). It is not even that well written or exciting! If you are looking for a religious thriller at least read Angels and Demons or the DaVinci Code. They are slightly more believable!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got an advance copy of this at the Book Expo America convention last weekend. This was the 'buzz' book, the one everyone was talking about. I stood in line to get it, missing other books I probably would have enjoyed more, because it was like the popular girl in school. Similar to that girl, this book has done some unsavory things to achieve its popularity and is very shallow and not worth the time to read it, nor the cover price. The concept that Jesus and Mary Magdelene had offspring has been done to death, thank you. The cool thing about the da Vinci code was the code itself and Dan Brown's light way of explaining complex puzzles. There's something creepy about a spinoff of his idea written by someone else. Ms. Magowan cannot shine his shoes as a writer. What this boils down to is a cheap attempt on the part of the publisher, or a not-so-cheap attempt, to cash in on someone else's success. It doesn't work as a book, and I hope it won't work as a marketing ploy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book in 4 days!!! Couldn't put it down! Very feasible story line!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The trilogy is amazing & I couldn't put the books down once I started. The Expected One gives one a LOT to think about. The biggest question is "What If???" Great for book club discussion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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BookaholicGrandMa More than 1 year ago
Fantastic storyline that kept me turning the pages. Thriller, mystery, love story, historical info, "The Expected One" is everything I love in a book and so much more. The story touched my heart in a way no other book (except the Bible) ever has. Whether read as fiction or fact, the courage and love expressed by the characters in this story make it is a true blessing to read. I would give it 100 stars if I could!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book expecting far more but it turned out to be written by a rank amature and is very inaccurate historicaly. If she researched this for twenty years as claimed, then she should have acquired even a little better knowledge of French history, but obviously she didn't. The author's claims about her visions and hoped for royal bloodlines do not make this more readable or more interesting or more accurate, but less. Her ego and pandering for Hollywood screen play glare through on every poorly written and tedious page. Her take on Gospel characters was insulting and crude, especially presuming we would all believe that Magdalene was beaten daily by her first husband, John the Baptist. Really? The whole book is based on 'dreams' that she claims are historically accurate revelations. With no grounding in fact or in the real world, she presents glaring historical errors again and again, not to mention the tedious repetitions describing the 'cute petite redhaired Maureen Paschel hiking around in designer shoes who obviously does not know French or French history' who is in reality the author (as she sees herself) as she explained in the back section. I rarely give harsh reviews. In fact I give credit to new authors who show sincere potential even though their first offerings might lack some luster, but this book left me embarressed to waste my money on such poor writing and famished to return to real literature. Avoid.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While the book had some interesting ideas - some of the plot was turgid and the rewriting of the gospel itself - shall we say in modern illiterate style - was irritating - especially Jesus suppoosedly referring to MM as My Dove I would suggest that Maureen consider aaa/ Having the Gospel of Mary rewritten entirely by somebody with real talent bbb/ should avoid horrendous expressions like their eyes locked or plunked ccc/ her explanation about Abbe Saunier's wealth while possible is not very convincing ddd/ also i have the impression that she was itching to say that John's son - MM's first born who she states she was married to - was probably Saul who became Paul ? That would fit perfectly would it not? Clearly she needs a better publisher who can improve the text beyond the semi-literate American urban house wife style - or possibly get some really gifted author to rehash it for her The text is not credible the way it is currently written - just grates actually The bloodline hypothesis is all very well but noone has actually proved the existance of such a hidden society at all points in history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got about halfway through this book before beginning to question the 'facts' the author so easily provided. Many of them simply are not true! Even the smallest details--like Marie Antoinette's followers traveling to New Orleans was wrong (they went to what is now called French Asylum, in Standing Stone Twp., Bradford County, Pa.). I know this because I am a decendant of one of the followers. I did find the flashbacks quite interesting, however. The author stated that the book was based in part on oral history however, given the many inaccuracies to historical fact, one would think the author did absolutely no research whatsoever, making for a very disappointing read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kathleen Mcgowan released this book with a lot of hype about it being autobiographical. The man character, 'cute, petite, sweet, the expected one' (ad nauseum self-descriptions)she believes is herself. If she had access to the 'secret documents'as she claims, the world of theology and archaeology would be beating a path to her door! They're yawning instead. She wants us to believe she is the chosen Grail child, then she admits there are millions of them around anyway. She fails to describe who or how she got chosen for this mission to the exclusion of all the other millions of potential Grail heirs. Without a leg to stand on, she proclaims it must be her unique visions that qualifies her above all others. But alas, this is poorly written, highly imaginative fiction and nothing more. You figured that out already I'm sure. So let's examine the other claim the author made, that this is based on her life, this is 'autobiographical' and she really wants us to believe her and her visions because she is such a nice trustworthy person after all. In the buy another bridge category, I examined the author's online presence. That was better than the fictional autobiography she wrote! The author's background is a wonder in itself. She has religious visions and experiences that are very real to her. She also has a former life as a proclaimed hereditary Wiccan goddess, and as a covert operative for the Government, and as the sole and rightful possessor of Linda Goodman's work (which coincidentaly Linda Goodman herself placed online years before to share with the world). Threats of lawsuites followed her claims. Finally, we have her experience as a 'certified hypnotherapist' (total educational requirement is 2 days online) As a Disney 'special events' coordinator, she was hypontizing Disney employees as a sideline. She gathered so much 'secret' information that she broke with the code of ethics for hypnotherapists to write a 'tell-all' expose about Disney and Eisner. Threats of lawsuites followed. That book flunked mightily. Are you surprised? Well, you get the idea. Neither this book, 'The Expected One' nor this author, Kathleen McGowan, have the credibility required to make this combination work. Save your money and buy lunch instead. The slight indigestion would be 'The Expected' One' and much more palatable than this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a great book, you really can feel the beautiful message either if you believe it can be true or no, just your heart can tell you!
Hill_Ravens More than 1 year ago
Not sure what I expected but the book truly out did itself. This had been on my too read shelf for awhile and I was very pleasantly surprised, delighted and engaged with the book. A story about a lady's journey through her mysterious past and into the pages of legends, and historical characters. Through Maureen's journey history of 2,000 years ago comes alive with a tremendous human aspect to it, which I feel has been lost via translation and time. While the bulk of the story centers on Mary Magdalene and the oral traditions of her place in history, there are many other characters and historical icons discussed in a very healthy, engaging manner. The characters are developed only to the point required to tell the story colorfully and descriptively. I have to assume some of the main characters in this book are revisited and developed further in the remaining books in the series. I want to compare it to the Da Vinci Code but this was so much more, more, more that it would be an injustice to do so. Highly recommend the book for personal insight, exploration and healthy dynamic thought on history as you have been taught it. I look forward to reading more by Kathleen and diving into the next book in this series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Expected One is a determined but less suspenseful and less charming take on the DaVinci Code. The premise is basically the same, the presumed relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene. While the DaVinci Code nimbled at the lines between fact and truth, the Expected One goes full bore, divisely forcing its case down your throat. The main character, Maureen, is presented so tepidly that you never really feel any empathy for her cause. The Expected One is a interesting read, but lacks the depth of the DaVinci Code because it gives the entire story away in the first few chapters. In the final analysis, this book attempts to do what others have allready done, but fails to do it better.