Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

by Noah Wardrip-Fruin

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Overview

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies by Noah Wardrip-Fruin

From the complex city-planning game SimCity to the virtual therapist Eliza: how computational processes open possibilities for understanding and creating digital media.

What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough — or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential.

Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262517539
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 02/29/2012
Series: Software Studies
Pages: 504
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Noah Wardrip-Fruin is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the coeditor of four collections published by the MIT Press: with Nick Montfort, The New Media Reader (2003); with Pat Harrigan, First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game (2004), Second Person: Role-Playing and Story in Games and Playable Media (2007), and Third Person: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives (2009).

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