EYEWITNESS TO SHILOH - Accounts of Union and Confederate Soldiers and Officers at the Battle of Shiloh, April 1862

EYEWITNESS TO SHILOH - Accounts of Union and Confederate Soldiers and Officers at the Battle of Shiloh, April 1862

by Bob Underdown

NOOK Book(eBook)

$3.99

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

EYEWITNESS TO SHILOH - Accounts of Union and Confederate Soldiers and Officers at the Battle of Shiloh, April 1862


Accounts from Union and Confederate participants at the Battle of Shiloh, from Sir Henry Morton Stanley a private in the Confederate Army to Major General US Grant himself.


'Let the generals and historians, therefore, write of the movements of corps, divisions, and brigades. I have naught to tell but the simple story of what one private soldier saw of one of the bloodiest battles of the war.' Lt. Leander Stillwell, 61st Illinois Volunteer Infantry.

'This was the first big battle in which our regiment had ever been engaged. I do not pretend to tell of what command distinguished itself; of heroes; of blood and wounds; of shrieks and groans; of brilliant charges; of cannon captured, etc. I was but a private soldier, and if I happened to look to see if I could find out anything, "Eyes right, guide center," was the order. "Close up, guide right, halt, forward, right oblique, left oblique, halt, forward, guide center, eyes right, dress up promptly in the rear, steady, double quick, charge bayonets, fire at will," is about all that a private soldier ever knows of a battle. ' Pvt Sam R. Watkins, 1st Tennessee Infantry, Company H (CS)

'The battle opened by the enemy's battery, in the woods to our front, throwing shells into our camp. Taylor's and Waterhouse's batteries promptly responded, and I then observed heavy battalions of infantry passing obliquely to the left, across the open field in Appler's front; also, other columns advancing directly upon my division. Our infantry and artillery opened along the whole line, and the battle became general. Other heavy masses of the enemy's forces kept passing across the field to our left, and directing their course on General Prentiss. I saw at once that the enemy designed to pass my left flank, and fall upon Generals McClernand and Prentiss, whose line of camps was almost parallel with the Tennessee River, and about two miles back from it. Very soon the sound of artillery and musketry announced that General Prentiss was engaged; and about 9 A. M. I judged that he was falling back. ' General W. T. Sherman, USA.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940013290112
Publisher: Cherry Lane Ebooks
Publication date: 10/20/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 597 KB

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews