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The Falcon's Malteser
     

The Falcon's Malteser

4.1 36
by Anthony Horowitz
 

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When the vertically-challenged Johnny Naples entrusts Tim Diamond with a package worth over three million pounds, he’s making a big mistake. Tim Diamond is the worst detective in the world. Next day, Johnny’s dead, Tim feels the heat, and his smart younger brother, Nick, gets the package—and every crook in town on his back!

Overview

When the vertically-challenged Johnny Naples entrusts Tim Diamond with a package worth over three million pounds, he’s making a big mistake. Tim Diamond is the worst detective in the world. Next day, Johnny’s dead, Tim feels the heat, and his smart younger brother, Nick, gets the package—and every crook in town on his back!

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
First published in the U.K. in 1986 and subsequently made into a film called variously Diamond's Edge and Just Ask for Diamond, The Falcon's Malteser is the first in Horowitz's long-running Diamond Brothers Mystery series, now being reissued in an Americanized edition. Herbert Simple, who was fired from the London police department for stupidity and who is a coward to boot, is trying to scratch out a living as the world's worst private detective under the rather romantic name of Tim Diamond. Fortunately his thirteen-year-old brother, Nick, the book's narrator, is made of sterner and smarter stuff. When a mysterious dwarf leaves a package in their hands for safekeeping and is then found murdered, the Diamond brothers leap-or perhaps stumble-into action. The package, it turns out, contains a box of malted milk balls, the Maltesers of the title. Several of the most important criminals in London, among them a near-anorexic known as the Fat Man and a pair of hitmen named Gott and Himmell, apparently believe it to be the key to millions of dollars in diamonds. The book features some nice word play, and Horowitz takes great pleasure in parodying the various cliches of film noir and the hardboiled detective novel, although many of these references will be lost on the story's intended audience. On the other hand, more sophisticated teen readers might wonder why British kids in London are paying for things in dollars and cents. In the sequel, Public Enemy Number Two, Nick Diamond is framed for a jewelry heist and finds himself behind bars, sharing his cell with Johnny Powers, public enemy number one. Nick must break out of jail in order to clear his name and catch the guy who set himup, but he has only his incompetent brother to depend on, which means that things do not look good. The Diamond Brothers stories are invariably funny and full of excitement. Mystery readers with a sense of humor will enjoy both tales and look forward to further books in the series. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2004, Philomel, 224p., Ages 11 to 15.
—Michael Levy
Children's Literature
Horowitz launches his "Diamond Brothers" mystery series with a funny and clever spoof of Bogart-inspired private-eye detective films. Bogart references abound, from the title (the Falcon is a crime lord, who has hidden the secret to his diamond stash in a box of "Malteasers," malted-milk chocolate candies), to the appearance of a world-weary cabaret singer named Lauren Bacardi who performs at the Casablanca Club. Thirteen-year-old Nick's older brother, Herbert (aka Tim Diamond), is a disastrously incompetent private detective, aided in solving the mystery of the hidden diamonds at every point by his sharp-eyed and sarcastic younger sibling. Horowitz provides a gallery of the usual sorts of eccentric suspects—a dead dwarf, a crazed criminal professor "who invented computer fraud five years before someone invented the computer," German thugs in matching suits named Gott and Himmel, and the oddly thin "Fat Man" who poisons London's pigeons just for fun. There are grisly murders aplenty (including one of a department-store Santa), and lots of seedy London atmosphere (though why everyone deals in dollars rather than pounds is a puzzle). Nick narrates the story in an amusing, breezy style: "I wish someone had told me it was Knock Out Nick Diamond Week in London"; "I've got better things to spend my pocket money on. New pockets, for example." The ingeniously plotted finale should leave young readers (at least, those who aren't averse to encountering a multiplicity of corpses) looking forward to the next installment of Nick's adventures. 2004 (orig. 1995), Philomel, Ages 9 to 12.
—Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Nick Simple's life is anything but simple. His parents have moved to Australia, leaving him in the care of his incompetent older brother who is trying to make a living as a private detective and changes the family name. They are visited by a dwarf who leaves a package with them for safekeeping and later turns up dead. Set in England and filled with a variety of colorful characters, the plot reads like a 1940s P.I. movie. Like Horowitz's "Alex Rider" series (Philomel), the teen protagonist relies on his wits to thwart the enemy. Short chapters, with a conflict in each one, will appeal to reluctant readers.-Kim Carlson, Monticello High School, IA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142402191
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
07/12/2004
Series:
Diamond Brothers Series , #1
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
694,995
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.56(d)
Lexile:
640L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Anthony Horowitz has been called "the busiest writer in Britain" by a major British newspaper-and with good reason. He is passionate about his work, often writing ten hours a day as he tries to balance multiple careers as a novelist, playwright, and screenwriter for television and movies. He is also the author of The Devil and His Boy and the Alex Rider Adventures.

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4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a really good book! I would recommend it to people who like adventure, mystery, and suspense!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing book great read this book for school and got so intiriged couldent put down the book any of you that dont like it or bag on it you dont know what you are talking about
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't understand why some other people think this is inappropriate. It is filled with action and some really close details, that's all. If they think it's not a good book, DON'T READ IT! It is up to you to decide whether or not to read it. In my opinion, this is a GREAT book that whoever likes action should read. Why did she keep on reading the book if it scared her? Because the book was good. Not intended for nine and under!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is totally inappropriate for children. The back of this book says ages 8 and up. My 9 year old daughter was 3/4 of the way through this book when she came to me and said it was scaring her. I read some of it and it contained passages where a shopping mall Santa was shot in the head and blood slowly trickled out, a kid gets his feet encased in cement and threatened to be thrown into a river, several murders by gunshot and a kidnapping. I don't consider myself overly protective but this book would be out of line by anyone's standards. What was this publisher thinking!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever gave this book a zero- i dont like u. This book has everything that u could ever want in a book. Anthony Horowitz has done it again!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book but why is only number two and number seven on nook?
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Paul Grove More than 1 year ago
This is the only book out of the whoe series that I have not read. But I am very confident that Anthony Horowitz has a bunch more action packed adventure in this book as all his other sensational books in this series. It seems tht for every different book there is a totally different action sequence tht is more interesting than the one before.
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