The Fall of the House of Usher

The Fall of the House of Usher

by Edgar Allan Poe

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Overview

The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe

The Fall of the House of Usher author: Edgar Allan Poe

ly the real aspect of the building. Its principal feature seemed to be that of an excessive antiquity. The discoloration of ages had been great. Minute fungi overspread the whole exterior, hanging in a fine tangled web-work from the eaves. Yet all this was apart from any extraordinary dilapidation. No portion of the masonry had fallen; and there appeared to be a wild inconsistency between its still perfect adaptation of parts, and the crumbling condition of the individual stones. In this there was much that reminded me of the specious totality of old wood-work which has rotted for long years in some neglected vault, with no disturbance from the breath of the external air. Beyond this indication of extensive decay, however, the fabric gave little token of instability. Perhaps the eye of a scrutinizing observer might have discovered a barely perceptible fissure, which, extending from the roof of the building in front, made its way down the wall in a zigzag direction, until it became lost in the sullen waters of

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781726498050
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 09/06/2018
Pages: 46
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.10(d)

About the Author

Edgar Allan Poe (/po_/; born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 - October 7, 1849) was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre. He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism in the United States and American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story. Poe is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction.

Poe was born in Boston, the second child of two actors. His father abandoned the family in 1810, and his mother died the following year. Thus orphaned, the child was taken in by John and Frances Allan of Richmond, Virginia. They never formally adopted him, but Poe was with them well into young adulthood. Tension developed later as John Allan and Edgar repeatedly clashed over debts, including those incurred by gambling, and the cost of secondary education for the young man. Poe attended the University of Virginia for one semester but left due to lack of money.

Poe and his works influenced literature in the United States and around the world, as well as in specialized fields such as cosmology and cryptography. Poe and his work appear throughout popular culture in literature, music, films, and television. A number of his homes are dedicated museums today.The Mystery Writers of America present an annual award known as the Edgar Award for distinguished work in the mystery genre.

Read an Excerpt

DURING the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country, and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was--but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me--upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain--upon the bleak walls--upon the vacant eye-like windows--upon a few rank sedges--and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees--with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium--the bitter lapse into every-day life--the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart--an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it--I paused to think--what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher? It was a mystery all insoluble; nor could I grapple with the shadowy fancies that crowded upon me as I pondered. I was forced to fall back upon the unsatisfactory conclusion, that while, beyond doubt, there are combinations of very simple natural objects which have the power of thus affecting us, still the analysisof this power lies among considerations beyond our depth. It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down--but with a shudder even more thrilling than before--upon the remodelled and inverted images of the gray sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.

Nevertheless, in this mansion of gloom I now proposed to myself a sojourn of some weeks. Its proprietor, Roderick Usher, had been one of my boon companions in boyhood; but many years had elapsed since our last meeting. A letter, however, had lately reached me in a distant part of the country--a letter from him--which, in its wildly importunate nature, had admitted of no other than a personal reply. The MS. gave evidence of nervous agitation. The writer spoke of acute bodily illness--of a mental disorder which oppressed him--and of an earnest desire to see me, as his best and indeed his only personal friend, with a view of attempting, by the cheerfulness of my society, some alleviation of his malady. It was the manner in which all this, and much more, was said--it was the apparent heart that went with his request--which allowed me no room for hesitation; and I accordingly obeyed forthwith what I still considered a very singular summons.

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The Fall Of The House Of Usher 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was very amusing. A high quality of confusing vocabulary. Keeps you on the edge of your seat especially the ending! Overall this was a very scary story that will interest all fans of horror.
Anna Peebler More than 1 year ago
I had to read this for my American Literature class.Definitely spooked me!I really enjoyed it.
Roger Farris More than 1 year ago
Don't read inn the late evening,or night.difficult too understand some of the sentences that he wrote.good story line and a must for reading around halloween time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Poe's horrifying tale will grip readers and leave them feeling uneasy, yet satisfied in experiencing his literary genius.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i thought this was a good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Grows over their heads
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A giant hall stretches, reaching a lit up room with a glowing floor and the statue of a dragon at the center. The dragon is a golden waterfountain, a pool of the most beautiful fish surround it. A shining, crystal chandelier hangs, candles that never burn out placed on it. The chandelier gives the water and gold a beautiful look. A table of ice that never melts circles the fountain. Glowing white plates lay on the table, gem designs etched into the surface. Silverware made out of real silver is placed by each lovely plate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Edgar is very strange because he had a bad life. He loved his mother more than anything. She died, and Edgar was very dipressed. He put all his feelings in the stories he wrote. Then he got engaged, the wife died too. Edgar was so depressed. That is all I am going to say.
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Cool book of all time
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