Family

Family

by Micol Ostow

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Overview

Family by Micol Ostow

I have always been broken. I could have died. And maybe it would have been better if i had.



It is a day like any other when seventeen-year-old Melinda hits the road for San Francisco, leaving behind her fractured home life and a constant assault on her self-esteem. Henry is the handsome, charismatic man who comes upon her, collapsed on a park bench, and offers love, a bright new consciousness, and—best of all—a family. One that will embrace her and give her love. Because family is what Mel has never really had. And this new family, Henry's family, shares everything. They share the chores, their bodies, and their beliefs. And if Mel truly wants to belong, she will share in everything they do. No matter what the family does, or how far they go.



Told in episodic verse, Family is a fictionalized exploration of cult dynamics, loosely based on the Manson Family murders of 1969. It is an unflinching look at people who are born broken, and the lengths they'll go to to make themselves "whole" again.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781606843932
Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/23/2013
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 684,430
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile: 900L (what's this?)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Micol Ostow has been writing professionally since 2004, and in that time has written and/or ghostwritten over 40 published works for young readers. She started her reign of terror with Egmont with her novel family, which Elizabeth Burns named a favorite of 2012 on her School Library Journal-syndicated blog, A Chair, a Fireplace, a Tea Cozy. Micol's graphic novel, So Punk Rock (and Other Ways to Disappoint Your Mother), was named a 2009 Booklist Top Ten Arts Books for Youth Selection, a Booklist Top Ten Religion Books for Youth Selection, and a Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Teens. She received her MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from the Vermont College of Fine Arts, and currently teaches a popular young-adult writing workshop through MediaBistro.com.

Customer Reviews

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Family 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Answer the question
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was really difficult to get into this book. The format was a little strange, as well. To someone who has never heard of the Manson Family, this may seem like a compelling story, but to me it was just a retelling of actual events.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi remember me? from hamsters result 1. What are you guys doing?
J_ibbs More than 1 year ago
I first read this book about a year ago. Since then I have read it at least 12 times. I was a little skeptic at first, but towards the middle of the first chapter I could NOT put it down. I finished this the first day I bought it and is probably one of my favourites. The author did a wonderful job with this piece, it's very captivating and nice to see a view on the Mansons, other than what the media portrays. I have recommended this book to everyone I know, and I highly recommend it to anyone thinking about getting this book. It will NOT disappoint!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi...I got locked out of first result
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really hard to follow. The type.of verse that it was written in was definitely hard to understand.
Nikkayme More than 1 year ago
3.5 stars Family is one of the most disturbing and terrifying, yet oddly captivating, books that I have ever read. As someone who only knows the barest facts about the Manson family murders, Micol Ostow's take on 17 year old Mel's descent into cult life is haunting and creepy. We get to see her slowly, but surely lose herself to this notion of family; which is ludicrous and all kinds of messed up, but for someone who has come from so little and so much pain, it makes sense to Mel. I couldn't see the appeal or allure that Henry (the Charles Manson-esque figure) has. It's difficult to understand why so many people would follow him willingly and look at him like a Jesus Christ figure. Mel, Sherry, Leila, Junior, and all the people we don't hear from view Henry as a savior and a preacher. Ostow solidifies this fact with her episodic verse, having Henry's name, His references, be the only things that stand out with capitalization. It's to ensure that he reader knows, without a doubt, that Henry is running the show. He has essentially brainwashed these people, forced their lives to revolve around him, and has put them into a drug-induced stupor at times, to benefit His own wants and needs. Mel's life has become the Henry show and she's willing to do whatever He wants, whenever He wants. It's incredibly sad. Mel's life before Henry was miserable, but her life after Henry isn't really a step up at all. At times, I wanted to hug her, but then other times I wanted to slap some sense into her; yell at her so she could see what's going on, that she has been indoctrinated into a desolate cult that's only purpose is to serve this Henry. What she's experiencing isn't love and even though a part of Mel knows that, she doesn't care. Her desire to be wanted and accepted - even if it's false - overrides the voice in the back of her mind that's telling her not to trust her situation. Family is incredibly disturbing with its back and forth from the slow, despondent fall into cult life, to its hints of the danger that's to come. Ostow has taken a story that many have at least the vaguest idea of and expanded upon it, dropped the reader into an endlessly forlorn situation and done so splendidly. Episodic verse works in this situation, making each day more painful and fractured. Knowing that things are going to end in a bloodbath makes Mel's life that much more affecting and I was glued to the page.
adm912 More than 1 year ago
Told in verse it's a chaotic yet deep read. Loosely based on the Manson family it gives you insight as to how or why a young girl would fall into a cult.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fhhhh