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Overview

Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev, Bernard G. (Translator) Guerney

Bazarov scorns traditional Russian values, shocks respectable society and, for the young, represents the spirit of rebellion. His experiences, however, lead him to conclude that Russia has no practical use for revolutionaries. First published in 1861, this is a powerful picture of the clash between generations.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780075536345
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date: 01/28/1961
Series: Modern Library College Editions Series

About the Author

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev was born in 1818 in the Province of Orel, and suffered during his childhood from a tyrannical mother. After the family had moved to Moscow in 1827 he entered Petersburg University where he studied philosophy. When he was nineteen he published his first poems and, convinced that Europe contained the source of real knowledge, went to the University of Berlin. After two years he returned to Russia and took his degree at the University of Moscow. In 1843 he fell in love with Pauline Garcia-Viardot, a young Spanish singer, who influenced the rest of his life; he followed her on her singing tours in Europe and spent long periods in the French house of herself and her husband, both of whom accepted him as a family friend. He sent his daughter by a sempstress to be brought up among the Viardot children. After 1856 he lived mostly abroad, and he became the first Russian writer to gain a wide reputation in Europe; he was a well-known figure in Parisian literary circles, where his friends included Flaubert and the Goncourt brothers, and an honorary degree was conferred on him at Oxford. His series of six novels reflect a period of Russian life from 1830s to the 1870s: they are Rudin (1855), A House of Gentlefolk (1858), On the Eve (1859; a Penguin Classic), Fathers and Sons (1861), Smoke (1867) and Virgin Soil (1876). He also wrote plays, which include the comedy A Month in the Country; short stories and Sketches from a Hunter’s Album (a Penguin Classic); and literary essays and memoirs. He died in Paris in 1883 after being ill for a year, and was buried in Russia.

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Fathers and Sons 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Had to read it for school, frightened of russian novels until i read this. Fairly easy to follow, great characterizaton and theme!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story is an interesting introduction to Russian life in the 19th century, as well as a good study of generational differences, but the best part of this novel is the writing. There were numerous turns of phrase that I loved, and I found it highly entertaining in spots.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Fathers and Sons shows the timeless cycle of intergenerational rebellion and the resulting alientation of the generations. Written at the time of the emancipation of the Russian serfs, it deals with a self-proclaimed liberal father and his son, who under the influence of his brilliant friend, dismisses his father's liberal virtues as sentimentality. As with much Russian literature of the era, the story unfolds against a fascinating background with institutions and characters that are unfamiliar to Western readers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
FATHERS AND SONS treats Nihilism far more succinctly than any book I can think of and brought the idea to the ordinary mind through true to life characters that we can relate to. It is important because the ideas and methods of the most notorious Nihilists-Nechayev is considered to be very important by Al-Qaeda and other terrorist organizations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel deals with two main themes: On the one hand the natural conflict between different generations, and on the other the philosophy of nihilism, which professes a kind of utilitarianism based on natural science. Character opposition and plot structure is vital to interpreting the work; there is great irony in Bazarov's rather anticlimactic death. The world will go on without him. Turgenev is unfortunately stuck in the shadow of two other 19th century Russian realists...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was really boring, sometimes it was interesting to read though. The end was much more interesting to read than the beginning
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading this book (in Russian, not in English :)). I think that, although lots of people simply say that 'it's a great book', it has a really deep message and meaning, and it's really not that easy to understand. But seriously, I liked this book! I think that it's quite different when you read the translation, though.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has a few interesting ideas, including the introduction of the word 'nihilism.' The main character is somehow a mix between a Mark Twain hero and Hamlet. Anyway, it reads fast; so read it -- fast.