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Fear of a Mixed Planet
     

Fear of a Mixed Planet

by Shock-G
 
While the "Humpty Hump"'s funky breaks and lyrical high jinks were hallmarks of the Digital Underground sound, the song's success was also a limiting factor for the Bay Area group and Shock-G, their MC and co-founder. Caught between following it up and moving on, the Underground never quite recovered. Fear of a Mixed Planet, Shock-G's 2004 solo debut, finds the

Overview

While the "Humpty Hump"'s funky breaks and lyrical high jinks were hallmarks of the Digital Underground sound, the song's success was also a limiting factor for the Bay Area group and Shock-G, their MC and co-founder. Caught between following it up and moving on, the Underground never quite recovered. Fear of a Mixed Planet, Shock-G's 2004 solo debut, finds the MC exploring his mellow, even serious side. But the influence of that loopy, Parliament-derived psychedelia is still apparent throughout, and the album soon finds a groove between past, present, time, and space. Opener "Keep It Beautiful" laments the bling and bravado of hip-hop in the 21st century over sax and breezy rhythms. "You really want to be like 'Pac?" Shock asks, acknowledging his intertwined history with Tupac Shakur. "Read, shorty, read." "Cherry Flava'd Email" and "Cinnamon Waves" mesh easygoing flows with lush keys and understated beats (with the latter featuring scratches from DJ Q-Bert), while "Baby You Okay?" is a disjointed, first-person mood piece about getting high in the wrong place, and the adolescent rumination "Rime in the Mochanut" is full of cleverly-blended lyricisms from Shock. Meanwhile, mid-album standouts "Gotchoo" and "We're All Killaz" are stripped-down and surprisingly heady examinations of cultural and sexual politics. Mixed Planet isn't all fluttery keyboards and deep emotions. "Holme Down Up" features harder beats and raps from Yukmouth and Java, while "My Opinion" plays the rather extreme views of Numskull off Shock's cooler head. Though they don't agree on banning country music, the Bush administration gets no love from either. Fear of a Mixed Planet's multiple subjects and generally airier sound show how curious Shock-G has remained since Digital Underground's hiatus. But he's also maintained his signature sense of humor, as the re-emergence of his Humpty Hump alter ego on the album's gently psychedelic finale proves.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/28/2004
Label:
33Rd Street
UPC:
0806403334120
catalogNumber:
3341

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Shock-G   Primary Artist,Piano,Keyboards,Electric Piano
Walter Davis   Saw
Stephanie Mills   Vocals
Money-B   Vocals
DJ Q-Bert   scratching,Turntables
BT   Vocals
Jerry Teel   Vocals
5th Element   Vocals
Kent Racker   Guitar
Jason Petty   Vocals
Ibo Rodriguez   Vocals
D Sharp   scratching,Turntables

Technical Credits

R. Bell   Composer
D.J. Brooks   Composer
Shock-G   Arranger,Producer
T. Samuel White   Composer
E. Baker   Composer
KC Porter   Composer
Chris Clay   Composer,Producer
R. Tyson   Composer
M.S. Russell   Composer
Marc Rosenberg   Arranger,Composer,Producer
Metaphysical Jones   Composer
Ibo Rodriguez   Engineer
W. Eugene Davis   Composer
D Sharp   Producer

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