Feast Day of Fools (Hackberry Holland Series #3)

Feast Day of Fools (Hackberry Holland Series #3)

by James Lee Burke
3.9 55

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Feast Day of Fools 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just dropped about $25 for this book because JLB is one of my favorite wrters and in fack I have read EVERY ONE of his books. But, folks, more and more his books are filled with his left wing political opinions and not just a good story. If you read this one here is what you will come away with: 1. Illegal aliens good- american citizens bad. 2. Helping to smuggle illegal aliens into the country is the same as helping slaves escape the south during the civil war. PLEASE! 3. Left wing, totalitarian governments good- american government evil to the core. 4. anyone opposing a total open border policy is a right wing, racist, gun toting, redneck. 5. Left wing goverments should be free to slaughter their own people without us bombing them. i.e. Pol Pot and his band of merry men in Cambodia. JLB, are you putting all this in your last few books to suck up to book reviewers? You don't need to, you know, as we will buy your books anyway, regardless of what some book reviewer says. Put your politics on your web site and leave them out of your books. We pay hard earned money for a novel and if we want political views we will by a non fiction book, on that subject, and will know what we are getting.
JaneM2 More than 1 year ago
The origin of the title tells it all about this dark and complex story. In typical fashion JLB paints a great picture of the remote and lonely place the story takes place and the sometimes bizarre people who live there. Hackberry's nemesis from Rain Gods, Preacher Jack Collins shows up to haunt him again with his own personal brand of justice. Several other characters make appearances and typically some evolve from bad guys to good guys in the end. The story about Reverend Cody Daniels is particularly disturbing to read. The story line moves very steady so there are few if any slow spots which kept me reading late into the night. Highly recommend this to all Dave Robicheaux fans who will relate to Hackberry Holland as one with the same character and integrity to support the law fairly.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
James Lee Burke writes fiction that exceeds the norm, and I appreciate his works for that. His writing is fine, his characters always interesting. The corruption of the soul is a favorite topic for him, and for me, but here there is just maybe a little too much of it. A shorter novel may have told the story just as well. As it is, the feast day leaves one a bit exhausted.
silencedogoodreturns More than 1 year ago
Sorry to say it, but Mr. Burke in my opinion has been less and less impressive over his past few novels. I know he is getting up in age, and sad to say, it seems to me he is just becoming another limosine liberal, guilt ridden by all the millions he has made from his writing, and so has taken an overly leftist bent in his story lines. I found the plot muddled and unconvincing. The Predator drone is now this eeeevil piece of hardware that only selfish criminals and psychopaths could support. America is an eeevil country killing innocent civilians around the world. And gosh, those eeevil Americans even think there is something wrong with allowing foreigners to stream across their border on their way to take advantage of the US taxpayer-provided public services. The horror! And his best (worst) line yet - "the Khmer Rouge were uneducated peasants who were bombed by B-52s." Yeah, Mr Burke, just a bunch of innocent peasants..who managed to murder literally millions of their own people. But it's the US' fault, right? After all, we bombed them. Yep, I think Mr Burke has gone over the deep end. Couldn't handle being rich, the guilt is too much. A shame, I"ve always found him to be the best writer of his time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
mt41w More than 1 year ago
Don't believe the negative reviews from the easily-offended and thin-skinned right-wing whackos who bash this book because Burke doesn't endorse their gun nut illegal-alien-hunting fantasies. Burke puts things in perspective that normal people can relate to, in a framework of an interesting story. An excellent read, great story and very much reflective of the current political climate. I've read nearly everything Burke has written over the years and love this series with Hackberry and his approach to life and love and law enforcement. GET IT!
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No one writes descriptive atmosphiire like he does his words are like poetry
daveb48 More than 1 year ago
Although this is part of a series, it works well as a stand alone. Hackberry Holland is cut from much of the same cloth as Dave Robicheaux, although a generation older (Korean War vet vs. Vietnam). One of the antiheroes (there are many) is Preacher Jack Collins. Collins is one of the more, shall we say, unique evildoers in all of literature. James Lee Burke has an especially well developed talent for mining the lesser angels of human nature and it works well here. This one deserves its five-star rating in my opinion.
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