ISBN-10:
0253219299
ISBN-13:
9780253219299
Pub. Date:
02/05/2008
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
ISBN-10:
0253219299
ISBN-13:
9780253219299
Pub. Date:
02/05/2008
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Fiddling in West Africa: Touching the Spirit in Fulbe, Hausa, and Dagbamba Cultures

Fiddling in West Africa: Touching the Spirit in Fulbe, Hausa, and Dagbamba Cultures

by Jacqueline Cogdell DjeDje Jacqueline Cogdell DjeDje
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Overview

Fiddling has had a lengthy history in Africa which has long been ignored. Jacqueline Cogdell DjeDje corrects this oversight with an expansive study on fiddling in the Fulbe, Hausa, and Dagbamba cultures of West Africa. DjeDje not only explains the history of the instrument itself, but also discusses the processes of stylistic transference and adaptation, suggesting how these may have contributed to differing performance practices. Additionally, DjeDje delves into the music, the performance context, the musicians behind the fiddle, the meaning of the instrument, and its use in these three cultures. This detailed work helps the reader understand and appreciate three little-known musical cultures in West Africa and the fiddle's influence upon them.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780253219299
Publisher: Indiana University Press
Publication date: 02/05/2008
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jacqueline Cogdell DjeDje is Professor and Chair of Ethnomusicology and former Director of the Ethnomusicology Archive at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Table of Contents

Contents
Acknowledgments

Introduction: A Master Fiddler and a Significant but Little-Known Tradition
1. Fiddling in West Africa: Understanding the Culture Area
2. An Affirmation of Identity: Fulbe Fiddling in Senegambia
3. Calling the Bori Spirits: Hausa Fiddling in Nigeria
4. In Service to the King: Dagbamba Fiddling in Ghana
Conclusion

Appendix: Distribution of the One-Stringed Fiddle
Notes
List of References
Discography and Videography
Index

What People are Saying About This

"The dissemination of the one-stringed fiddle tradition in Africa seems to be concentrated in the so-called "Sudanic Belt," an area that shares the border with the Pan-Arabic territory (also known as the Sahel). Djedje (UCLA) applies a multi-sited ethnography, focusing her research on the spread of the fiddle. She asserts that the dispersion of this instrument in West Africa is related to movement of the Fulbe, a nomadic people who originated in the Senegal Valley and migrated across West Africa, from Senegal to Lake Chad. The author successfully presents and demonstrates how the identity of this instrument has been reshaped to fit the history and ideology of ethnic groups that assimilated the instrument out of contact with the Fulbe. In addition to the lengthy bibliography, the book includes a generous "discography and videography of selected recordings of one-stringed fiddle music from West Africa," organized geographically by ethnic groups. This strong example of ethnomusicology will also benefit students of anthropology and ethnography. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. — Choice"

Wesleyan University - Eric Charry

This broad comparative approach synthesizing several decades of research is groundbreaking in both ethnomusicology and African studies, and the author has the expertise and authority to accomplish such a difficult project.

Kazadi wa Mukuna

The dissemination of the one-stringed fiddle tradition in Africa seems to be concentrated in the so-called "Sudanic Belt," an area that shares the border with the Pan-Arabic territory (also known as the Sahel). Djedje (UCLA) applies a multi-sited ethnography, focusing her research on the spread of the fiddle. She asserts that the dispersion of this instrument in West Africa is related to movement of the Fulbe, a nomadic people who originated in the Senegal Valley and migrated across West Africa, from Senegal to Lake Chad. The author successfully presents and demonstrates how the identity of this instrument has been reshaped to fit the history and ideology of ethnic groups that assimilated the instrument out of contact with the Fulbe. In addition to the lengthy bibliography, the book includes a generous "discography and videography of selected recordings of one-stringed fiddle music from West Africa," organized geographically by ethnic groups. This strong example of ethnomusicology will also benefit students of anthropology and ethnography. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. — Choice

Kazadi wa Mukuna]]>

The dissemination of the one-stringed fiddle tradition in Africa seems to be concentrated in the so-called "Sudanic Belt," an area that shares the border with the Pan-Arabic territory (also known as the Sahel). Djedje (UCLA) applies a multi-sited ethnography, focusing her research on the spread of the fiddle. She asserts that the dispersion of this instrument in West Africa is related to movement of the Fulbe, a nomadic people who originated in the Senegal Valley and migrated across West Africa, from Senegal to Lake Chad. The author successfully presents and demonstrates how the identity of this instrument has been reshaped to fit the history and ideology of ethnic groups that assimilated the instrument out of contact with the Fulbe. In addition to the lengthy bibliography, the book includes a generous "discography and videography of selected recordings of one-stringed fiddle music from West Africa," organized geographically by ethnic groups. This strong example of ethnomusicology will also benefit students of anthropology and ethnography. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. — Choice

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