Fields of Fury: The American Civil War

Fields of Fury: The American Civil War

by James M. McPherson
3.7 3

Hardcover(1ST)

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Fields of Fury: The American Civil War 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Payne_Lover_Reviews 8 months ago
This was a very informative juvinille novel of the Civil War. This is the first book I have read of his but I must say I am intrigued to read more. The cool thing about this book is that it includes all of the major battles/events in time order. Plus on the side of every page are quick facts about the event, they usually include interesting quotes from a direct witness or a little known fact, either way I found both interesting. I also thought that the pictures fit the book very nicely. This book was not hard to follow in any sense, so any child interested in learning about the Civil War would enjoy this book. It does include violence (but it is a Civil War book, you can't have a true Civil War book without violence) but it isn't too much.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EnglishTeacherVS More than 1 year ago
I used this book as a pictorial resource as the 7th grade class read the novel, Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt. Viewing actual pictures from that era while reading aloud factual accounts of key battles made the novel 'come alive' for many of the kids. Each picture/illustration in Fields of Fury is accompanied by a well-written summary of a battle, a prisoner of war camp, or an important event of the Civil War. This book is well worth adding to your classroom library...especially if you teach Civil War history or simply want an eye catching book for your English classroom. I would NOT recommend for lower grade levels 1st-4th, simply because some of the pictures are truly graphic, i.e., starving prisoners in the prison camps was a real eye opener to my 7th graders.