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Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt
     

Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt

by Nicholas Roe
 

Leigh Hunt is the forgotten giant of English Romanticism. The man Virginia Woolf called the “spiritual grandfather” of the modern world was descended from black Caribbeans and grew up a child of the American and French Revolutions. A poet and radical journalist, he threw off the shackles of the old order and campaigned tirelessly for Irish freedom and

Overview


Leigh Hunt is the forgotten giant of English Romanticism. The man Virginia Woolf called the “spiritual grandfather” of the modern world was descended from black Caribbeans and grew up a child of the American and French Revolutions. A poet and radical journalist, he threw off the shackles of the old order and campaigned tirelessly for Irish freedom and the abolition of slavery. Unwilling to view the Prince of Wales as an “Adonis in Loveliness,” Hunt was jailed for a “diabolical libel” that presented the prince as he was: a corpulent 50-year-old, sodden with drink and drugs. In prison, Hunt drew the homage of Lord Byron, and discovered the Romantic geniuses Keats and Shelley. Hunt’s own poetry glows with the sexual frankness that characterized all his relationships. Written with flair and brilliant imaginative insight, Fiery Heart is a sparkling portrait of Leigh Hunt and the English Romantics.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

A biography of Romantic writer Leigh Hunt, one of the most influential and controversial figures in the political and cultural life of 19th-century England.
Library Journal
Roe (English, St. Andrews Univ., Scotland; ed., Leigh Hunt: Life, Poetics and Politics) is well known for his critical and biographical works on major figures of the Romantic era. His new book creates a full and vivid portrait of poet/journalist Leigh Hunt (1784-1859) and his role as a central figure among the Romantics. Roe's inclusion of family controversies, American and French revolutions, and English history helps re-create Hunt's complex world. He focuses on Hunt's development into a writer and social critic while highlighting themes of friendship, protest, and illness. This astutely written and detailed work, which covers Hunt's first 37 years only, ends in 1822 with the tragic turning point in Hunt's life, the death of friend and poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. While Roe introduces new materials, stopping halfway through the author's life is a drawback, especially following on the heels of Anthony Holden's complete biography, Wit in the Dungeon: A Life of Leigh Hunt. One hopes that a second volume is in the works. Recommended for large academic collections with graduate literature programs.-Paolina Taglienti, Las Vegas Coll. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780712602242
Publisher:
Random House UK
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Pages:
448
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.34(d)

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"A biography that all students of Romanticism should read. Essential."

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